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Note: This is very similar to Determine number of bits in integral type at compile time, however this is a much simplified version, all contained in a single .cpp

Edit: Added a solution - although a correct explanation was given (and accepted) I found a way to solve the problem generically.

Problem

The problem is with functions like

 msg(int32_t);
 msg(int64_t);

a call like

long long myLong = 6;
msg(myLong);    // Won't compile on gcc (4.6.3), call is ambiguous

This compiles on MSVC. Can anyone provide an explanation of why this fails on gcc (I'm assuming it's probably to do with the fact gcc is usually strictly standards compliant) and an example of how to correctly achieve the same effect?

#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>

#include <boost/integer.hpp>

using namespace std;

void msg(int v) { cout << "int: " << sizeof(int) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg(long v) { cout << "long: " << sizeof(long) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg(long long v) { cout << "long long: " << sizeof(long long) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }

void msg2(int32_t v) { cout << "int32_t: " << sizeof(int32_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(int64_t v) { cout << "int64_t: " << sizeof(int64_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(uint32_t v) { cout << "uint32_t: " << sizeof(uint32_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(uint64_t v) { cout << "uint64_t: " << sizeof(uint64_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }


int main()
{

    int myInt = -5;
    long myLong = -6L;
    long long myLongLong = -7LL;

    unsigned int myUInt = 5;
    unsigned int myULong = 6L;
    unsigned long long myULongLong = 7LL;

    msg(myInt);
    msg(myLong);
    msg(myLongLong);

    msg2(myInt);
    msg2(myLong);     // fails on gcc 4.6.3 (32 bit)
    msg2(myLongLong);

    msg2(myUInt);
    msg2(myULong);   // fails on gcc 4.6.3 (32 bit)
    msg2(myULongLong);

   return 0;
}

// Output from MSVC  (and gcc if you omit lines that would be commented out)
int: 4 5
long: 4 6
long long: 8 7
int32_t: 4 -5
int32_t: 4 -6   // omitted on gcc
int64_t: 8 -7
uint32_t: 4 5
uint32_t: 4 6   // omitted on gcc
uint64_t: 8 7

Solution

The solution is provide a function that successfully maps int, long and long long to the appropriate int32_t or int64_t. This can be done trivially at run time via if (sizeof(int)==sizeof(int32_t)) type statements, but a compile-time solution is preferable. A compile-time solution is available via the use of boost::enable_if.

The following works on MSVC10 and gcc 4.6.3. The solution could be further enhanced by disabling for non-integral types, but that is outside the scope of this problem.

#include <iostream>
#include <stdint.h>

#include <boost/integer.hpp>
#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_signed.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_unsigned.hpp>

using namespace std;

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int32_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value,
 int32_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int64_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value, 
int64_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int64_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint32_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint32_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint64_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint64_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint64_t>(z); }

void msg(int v) { cout << "int: " << sizeof(int) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg(long v) { cout << "long: " << sizeof(long) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg(long long v) { cout << "long long: " << sizeof(long long) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }


void msg2(int32_t v) { cout << "int32_t: " << sizeof(int32_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(int64_t v) { cout << "int64_t: " << sizeof(int64_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(uint32_t v) { cout << "uint32_t: " << sizeof(uint32_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }
void msg2(uint64_t v) { cout << "uint64_t: " << sizeof(uint64_t) << ' ' << v << '\n'; }

int main()
{

    int myInt = -5;
    long myLong = -6L;
    long long myLongLong = -7LL;

    unsigned int myUInt = 5;
    unsigned int myULong = 6L;
    unsigned long long myULongLong = 7LL;

    msg(myInt);
    msg(myLong);
    msg(myLongLong);

    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myInt));
    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myLong));
    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myLongLong));

    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myUInt));
    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myULong));
    msg2(ConvertIntegral(myULongLong));

   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
MSVC has typedef _Longlong int64_t and gcc has typedef long long int int64_t, so I think the type is the same in both cases. At any rate, it is the call using long that is the problem... –  Zero May 14 '12 at 8:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Greg hits the nail on the head: int32_t and int64_t are typedefs which may or may not be long. If neither is a typedef for long, overload resolution can fail. Both long->int32_t and long->int64_t have Rank=Promotion (Table 12, 13.3.3.1.2)

share|improve this answer

Whether the code will compile or not is implementation defined. There is no type int32_t nor int64_t; these are simply typedef's to an existing integral type. If the type happens to be one that is already overloaded (int, long or long long), which is almost certainly the case, then you have multiple definitions of the same function. If they are in the same translation unit, it is a compile time error, requiring a diagnostic. If they are in different translation units, it's undefined behavior, but I imagine that most implementations will also generate an error.

In your case, the best solution is probably to make msg a template, and pass the name of the type in as an argument.

share|improve this answer
1  
How can it be the case that int32_t and int64_t are the same type? Shouldn't one have twice the bits of the other (as shown in the output of the test code)? At any rate, gcc has typedef int int32_t and typedef long long int int64_t, so they are not the same in this particular case, even if they could be the same on some other architecture. –  Zero May 14 '12 at 8:31
4  
There are no multiple definitions of the same functions. This could happen only if int32_t is the same as int64_t - which is impossible. The actual problem here is that in gcc on 32bit platforms, neither int32_t nor int64_t is typedef of long (first is just int, second one is long long). This is why, when you try to call msg(long) it is ambiguous –  Greg May 14 '12 at 8:34
1  
@Greg Yes. I'd missed the fact that the functions had different names, which of course changes everything. (Or not, because as you point out, the exact type of int32_t and int64_t is implementation defined. And since there are three calls to msg2, with three different types, at least one will fail to be an exact match, and depending on the actual typedefs, may be ambiguous. –  James Kanze May 14 '12 at 8:47

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