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For school we got a task to create a multithreaded application. We chose to make a multithreaded implementation of merge sort.

We however can't manage to make it work faster than the serial implementation.

I have already tried the following:

  • implementation with unlimited threads (code example 1) (was extremely slow)
  • implementation with limited threads (code example 2) (4 threads max - still really slow)
  • implementation using Parallel.Invoke (code example 3) (still slower)
  • complex implementation also with a parallel merge function (just shamefully slow)

When I use the analyze tools in Visual Studio (Instrumentation part) I found the timings for the functions called and the threaded solution is always extremely slower than the serial implementation.

I can't see any possible reason for this.

(for example: with 5000000 numbers to sort; serial implementation: 16.717,17; parallel: 20.259,97; results with just 1 extra thread)

I tested it on both machines I own:

  • Intel Core 2 Quad Q9450 @ 2.66Ghz
  • Intel Core i7 Q720 @1.60Ghz

I can't for my life figure out how this is possible, shouldn't this just speed up the process?

I would be really greatefull if somebody would be able to help me out.

code example 1:

ParallelMerge pMerge = new ParallelMerge(T, p1, q1 -1, p2, q2-1, A, p3);
Thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(pMerge.parallel_merge));
thread.Start();

ParallelMerge pMerge2 = new ParallelMerge(T, q1 + 1, r1, q2, r2, A, q3 + 1);
pMerge2.parallel_merge();
thread.Join();

code example 2:

if(depthRemaining > 0)
{
   ParallelMerge pMerge = new ParallelMerge(T, p1, q1 -1, p2, q2-1, A, p3);
   thread thread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(pMerge.parallel_merge));
   thread.Start();
   ParallelMerge pMerge2 = new ParallelMerge(T, q1 + 1, r1, q2, r2, A, q3 + 1);
   pMerge2.parallel_merge(); 
   thread.Join();
}
else
{
   ParallelMerge pMerge = new ParallelMerge(T, p1, q1 -1, p2, q2-1, A, p3);
   pMerge.parallel_merge(); 
   ParallelMerge pMerge2 = new ParallelMerge(T, q1 + 1, r1, q2, r2, A, q3 + 1);
   pMerge.parallel_merge(); 
}

code example 3:

if (depthRemaining > 0)
{
   Parallel.Invoke(
      () => threaded_merge_sort(getallen, p, q, depthRemaining-1));

   threaded_merge_sort(getallen, q + 1, r, 0);
}
else
{
   threaded_merge_sort(getallen, p, q, 0);
   threaded_merge_sort(getallen, q+1, r, 0);
}
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1  
Use the TPL (Parallel.Invoke) or the ThreadPool. –  Henk Holterman May 14 '12 at 9:27
    
Tipically, the bottleneck of sorting problems are I/O operations, so parallelizing the computations does not lead to great performance improvements. –  Cristiano May 14 '12 at 9:50
    
50000 numbers is not very many. Continual thread create/join means a huge pile of avoidable overhead. If you have a textbook that says that using threads requries creating them and then join()ing to wait for results, burn it. Look at ThreadPool/TPL as suggested by @HenkHolterman. –  Martin James May 14 '12 at 10:43
    
I tried it with TPL as displayed in example 3. This doesn't rlly give me a lot of slower speed. But it doesn't give a speedup as well. I also notices i missed out a few zero's on the numbers there. It should be 5000000, edited it now. –  Arne Claerebout May 14 '12 at 10:57
2  
Merge sorts are also better combined with an in-place sort on sub-lists of, say, CPU L1 cache-size. The thought of spawning a thread to merge sublists of 2 items is horrifying. –  Martin James May 14 '12 at 11:31
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

it seems the problem wasn't with the code but with the analysing tools from VS.

-Arne Claerebout

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What unit of time are you reporting in?

Starting a new thread is a 'slow' operation. Sorting/merging very short list using multi threading can be a bit slower.

If you just split the length of the number list in halve does the program run faster? if not you're code simply doesn't scale.

Answering this question without the actual code implementation is a bit hard to do.

share|improve this answer
    
the timings are in msec, I also noticed i missed a few zero's there. Should be 5000000 numbers. I posted my code on pastebin: pastebin.com/LrSKrSW2 –  Arne Claerebout May 14 '12 at 10:52
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