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Is there any possibility to create CSS definition for any element with the class "icon-" and then a set of letters but not numbers. According to this article something like:

[class^='/icon\-([a-zA-Z]+)/'] {}

should works. But for some reason it doesn't.

In particular I need to create style definition for all elements like "icon-user", "icon-ok" etc but not "icon-16" or "icon-32"

Is it possible at all?

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4  
The very first line of that article (emphasis added): "Regex Matching Attribute Selectors. They don’t exist, but wouldn’t that be so cool?" –  James Allardice May 14 '12 at 9:23
    
You can use only $=, *=, ^= with strings (not regexp) –  yAnTar May 14 '12 at 9:24
    
If you can't make it that way, just use a generic common class icon: <span class="icon icon-ok"></span>. –  sp00m May 14 '12 at 9:24
    
@JamesAllardice LOL, it's when you are searching for solution for hours and you don't read anymore really. –  Radek Suski May 14 '12 at 9:29
    
OK, thanks a lot, so it's definitely not possible. Pity :/ –  Radek Suski May 14 '12 at 9:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

CSS attribute selectors do not support regular expressions.

If you actually read that article closely:

Regex Matching Attribute Selectors

They don’t exist, but wouldn’t that be so cool? I’ve no idea how hard it would be to implement, or how to expensive to parse, but wouldn’t it just be the bomb?

Notice the first three words. They don't exist. That article is nothing more than a blog post lamenting the absence of regex support in CSS attribute selectors.

But if you're using jQuery, James Padolsey's :regex selector for jQuery may interest you. Your given CSS selector might look like this for example:

$(":regex(class, ^icon\-[a-zA-Z]+)")
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1  
LOL, it's when you are searching for solution for hours and you don't read anymore really. Thanks ;) –  Radek Suski May 14 '12 at 9:30

I answered this one on facebook but thought I'd best share here too :)

I haven't tested this so don't shoot me if it doesn't work :) but my guess would be to excplicitly target elements that contain the word icon in the classname, but to instruct the browser not to inlcude those classes containing numbers.

Example code:

div[class|=icon]:not(.icon-16, .icon-32, icon-64, icon-96) {.....}

Reference:

attribute selectors... (http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/selector.html#attribute-selectors): [att|=val]

Represents an element with the att attribute, its value either being exactly "val" or beginning with "val" immediately followed by "-" (U+002D).

:not selector... (http://kilianvalkhof.com/2008/css-xhtml/the-css3-not-selector/)

Hope this helps,

Waseem

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I tested my previous solution and can confirm that it DOES NOT work (see comment from BoltClock). This however does:

OP: "In particular I need to create style definition for all elements like "icon-user", "icon-ok" etc but not "icon-16" or "icon-32""

The required CSS code would look something like this:

/* target every element were the class name begins with ( ^= ) "icon" but NOT those that begin with ( ^= ) "icon-16", or "icon-32" */
*[class^="icon"]:not([class^="icon-16"]):not([class^="icon-32"]) {.....}

or

/* target every element were the class name begins with ( ^= ) "icon" but NOT those that contain ( *= ) the number "16" or the number "18" */
*[class^="icon"]:not([class*="16"]):not([class*="32"]) { ...... }

Test code:

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <style>
            div{border:1px solid #999;margin-bottom:1em;height:100px;}
            *[class|=icon]:not([class|=icon-16]):not([class|=icon-32]) {background:red;color:white;}
        </style>
    </head>     
    <body>
        <div class="icon-something">
            <h4>icon-something</h4>
            <p><strong>IS</strong> targeted therfore background colour will be red</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-anotherthing">
            <h4>icon-anotherthing</h4>
            <p><strong>IS</strong> targeted therfore background colour will be red</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-16-install">
            <h4>icon-16-install</h4>
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-16-redirect">
            <h4>icon-16-redirect</h4>
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-16-login">
            <h4>icon-16-login</h4>
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-32-install">
            <h4>icon-32-install</h4> 
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-32-redirect">
            <h4>icon-32-redirect</h4> 
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
        <div class="icon-32-login">
            <h4>icon-32-login</h4>
            <p>Is <strong>NOT</strong> targeted therfore no background colour</p>
        </div>
    </body>
</html>
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tested in ie9, ff12, Chrome and Safari = confirmed as working :) –  Bulletproof May 14 '12 at 16:36
    
Please see my comment on that blog post to understand why your original :not() selector didn't work and why you had to chain multiple selectors instead. –  BoltClock May 15 '12 at 3:00

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