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How can i create a cookie step by step,

that stores the user login id and password when he/she clicks Remember Me? option

and i am planing to kill this cookie after certain time

share|improve this question

Cookies are created the same way as they are in plain old ASP.NET, you just need to access the Response.

        public ActionResult Login(string username, string password, bool rememberMe)
        {
            // validate username/password

            if (rememberMe)
            {
               HttpCookie cookie = new HttpCookie("RememberUsername", username);
               Response.Cookies.Add(cookie);
            }

            return View();

        }

However, if you're using Forms Auth, you can just make your FormsAuth ticket cookie persistent:

        public ActionResult Login(string username, string password, bool rememberMe)
        {
            // validate username/password

            FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie(username, rememberMe);

            return View();

        }

You can read cookies like this:

public ActionResult Index()
{
    var cookie = Request.Cookies["RememberUsername"];

    var username = cookie == null ? string.Empty : cookie.Value; // if the cookie is not present, 'cookie' will be null. I set the 'username' variable to an empty string if its missing; otherwise i use the cookie value

    // do what you wish with the cookie value

    return View();
}

If you are using Forms Authentication and the user is logged in, you can access their username like this:

public ActionResult Index()
{


    var username = User.Identity.IsAuthenticated ? User.Identity.Name : string.Empty;

    // do what you wish with user name

    return View();
}

It is possible to decrypt and read the contents of a ticket. You can even store small amounts of custom data in the ticket, if you need to. See this article for more info.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi i have two things to ask....1. If we want to see the data stored in cookie in the view, then how can we see or call it? – P_A_1 May 14 '12 at 10:21
    
and 2. What is main difference between this cookies and FormsAuthentication ticket cookie? or both are same....? – P_A_1 May 14 '12 at 10:22
1  
Forms Authentication is a method of authenticating a user in ASP.NET. You don't have to use it, but it's widely used. The "ticket" is an encrypted cookie that the Forms Authentication module decrypts and validates upon receiving every request. If the ticket cookie is missing or invalid, the user is not considered logged in. Normally, you don't concern yourself with the contents of the FormsAuth cookie and just trust that the module is doing its job (which it does very well). I'll improve my answer with how to read cookies. – HackedByChinese May 14 '12 at 12:30
    
@HackedByChinese, well said. I just implimented Forms Authentication in my new application. Now I have a better understanding. Normally, I'm creating interal applications with Windows Authentication. – JoshYates1980 Oct 21 '14 at 20:24
    
@HackedByChinese, one more thing....in the article you provided, Dan Harden's last comment was "Not really sure whats going on there, although this tutorial is quite old now so things may have changed. All I can do is wish you good luck." Is it worth going the custom data route in the ticket? – JoshYates1980 Oct 21 '14 at 20:37

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