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I'm reading the source from mongoose: https://github.com/LearnBoost/mongoose/blob/master/lib/collection.js#L40

Collection.prototype.onOpen = function () {
  var self = this;
  this.buffer = false;
  self.doQueue();
};

I don't understand why the author assign this to self and run self.doQueue(). Why don't just run:

this.buffer = false;
this.doQueue();

I'm new to javascript, thanks for help.

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5 Answers 5

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You're right, in this instance they could have simply used this.

The use of me or self is a bit of a hack to ensure the correct context of this is used, as within JavaScript the scope of this is variant. If for example you have an event trigger a function within your class, this would be different, and wouldn't be your object that houses the function, but instead the object that called the function. To resolve this people often use me or self to ensure they're referring to the correct object... this, as in the actual object.

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The only reason you would usually do that is if the call to doQueue() is inside a block that will change the value of this such as another function.

In this case however it doesn't serve any purpose and was probably a remnant of older code that was not changed back.

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Most likely the developer wanted consistency, but failed at doing so.

Otherwise you'd be using this in some functions, self in other functions and a mix of both in other functions, depending on where you use the object and if you use nested functions/callbacks.

By always assigning this to self and then using the latter you have one additional assignment at the very beginning of each function but you always use self to access the object.

However, what the developer did in the code you posted does not make much sense. He should either use self or this both times instead of a mix that is not even necessary.

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... but in the line above he's doing this.buffer = false;. –  Matt May 14 '12 at 9:56

Just to give more clarity to @richard said earlier,

Collection.prototype.onOpen = function () {
  var self = this;
  this.buffer = false;
  this.onclick = function(){
     //do some other operations here
     //if you refer `this` here then, `this` will refer to present function not the above. so to make sure it is referring to exact object people pass this to `me` or `self`   
     self.doQueue();
  } 
 };
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1  
you can propose an edit to his answer rather than cluttering up the post, thank you. –  Eliran Malka May 14 '12 at 10:12

self is a copy of 'this',but it always refer to the right object,and 'this' may not.

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It will unless you create a new function scope. –  ThiefMaster May 14 '12 at 9:53
2  
This is a pretty hand waving answer with no examples and not a real explanation. –  Matt May 14 '12 at 9:54

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