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What is the real life use of Subject in Rx. I found one sample in 101 samples but i think that didn’t give me a clear idea about where to apply this. Please any one post some simple sample that demonstrate the work of subject in Rx. I am using this in the context of windows phone.

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have you seen this post: jeroenverhulst.be/post/2010/09/29/…? –  ie. May 14 '12 at 10:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Subject<T> is the List<T> of Rx - its simply an IObservable that you can manually signal:

var subj = new Subject<int>();
subj.Subscribe(Console.WriteLine);

subj.OnNext(4);
subj.OnNext(5);
subj.OnCompleted();

>>>  4
>>>  5

It's really useful for "wrapping" asynchronous methods that use non-Rx patterns, like callbacks or the APM. Check out this example from my book.

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The current guidance is that you should avoid using subjects in your code base. Well that is my opinion and I had Bart De Smet (Author of Rx) verbally agree this with me recently.

Most times I see the use of subjects, it can be replaced with Observable.Create<T>(IObserver<T>) or another one of the factories e.g. FromEventPattern, Timer, FromAPM etc...

See my blog posts on the matter:

http://www.introtorx.com/Content/v1.0.10621.0/02_KeyTypes.html

http://www.introtorx.com/Content/v1.0.10621.0/04_CreatingObservableSequences.html#CreationOfObservables

http://www.introtorx.com/Content/v1.0.10621.0/18_UsageGuidelines.html

There are two good exceptions to this guidance:

  1. If you are using a BehaviorSubject<T> as a backing field for a property
  2. When you are using the MultiCast operator, then using the Subjects can provide the feature set you are looking for...or you just use the baked in ones like .Replay(), .PublishLast()
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