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I want to initialize a user configuration through a user configuration file. The path for the file can be read from the registry. The file is located in a folder with the user's name.

So I need the following functionality:

  • Reading a string from registry
  • building the path to the configuration file
  • Reading the file into a configuration object

Now there are several approaches to handle this:

First, I need

  • one "helper"-class for getting the file path (let's call it Shared)
  • one "container"-class for the configuration information (let's call it Configuration)

So, Shared has a function/property like UserConfigurationFile which returns the path to the configuration file.

To get the path to the file I have a function InitializeUserConfigurationFile() which is called in the constructor of Shared:

class Shared {
    public Shared()
    {
        InitializeUserConfigurationFile();
    }

    void InitializeUserConfigurationFile()
    {
        //
        // Reads username
        //

        //
        // Reads path from Registry
        //

        //
        // etc.
        //

    }


    //
    // etc.
    //
}

Any better suggestions?

When I want to Initialize my Container I have different options:

  • Is it best to initialize the user configuration within the constructor?

Sth. like:

class Container
{
    Shared shared = new Shared();

    public Container()
    {
        InitializeUserConfiguration();
    }

    void InitializeUserConfiguration()
    {
        LoadConfiguration(shared.UserConfigurationFile);
    }

    void LoadConfiguration(string filename)
    {
        //
        // Initializes all parameters frome filename
        //
    }
}
  • Or through two steps (through an own method LoadConfiguration())?

Sth. like:

Shared    shared    = new Shared();
Container container = new Container();

container.LoadConfiguration(shared.UserConfigurationFile);
  • Or inside the constructor of Container by delivering a filename?

Sth. like:

Shared    shared    = new Shared();
Container container = new Container(shared.UserConfigurationFile);

or everything in Container..?

There are so many ways...

I hope somebody knows a best-approch...

Regards,

Inno

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

It is better to use standard configuration classes exist in .net. Such as ApplicationSettingsBase and Configuration.

Here you can find good article series:

  1. Unraveling the Mysteries of .NET 2.0 Configuration
  2. Unraveling the Mysteries of .NET 2.0 Configuration
  3. Cracking the Mysteries of .NET 2.0 Configuration
share|improve this answer
    
And what to do if you have a given application which uses this kind of configuration (using own files) since years? –  Inno Jun 29 '09 at 13:40
    
If it working, do not touch it. But you are asking for best approach, I suggest you best approach :) In general, using standard classes, you need to write less, spend less time, and make less errors. So maybe you need to think about configuration refactoring in one of the future version. –  arbiter Jun 29 '09 at 13:52
    
"But you are asking for best approach, I suggest you best approach :) " yes, you did ;) But if your application doesn't support best approach but "some approach" you need the best approach to handle this "some approach" %-) –  Inno Jun 29 '09 at 14:09

For best practices, don't use the registry, and don't reinvent the wheel.

Since you didn't mention it, have you looked at the System.Configuration namespace?

The .NET Framework constains a perfectly good configuration system that is well tested. It is also the domain of Sys Admins, who also know about config files and the accompanying tools.

So it is unclear why you are reinventing the wheel, possibly making it a little less round.

There are practical reasons to shun the Registry (distribution, backup) but also, as arbiter points out, it is not going to move to other (future) platforms. Did you notice that those namespaces are not starting with System ?

share|improve this answer
    
Why not use the registry? My co-worker wants me to save more information in the registry in future versions... –  Inno Jun 29 '09 at 13:39
    
Without registry, your application can be xcopy deployable, and in future it will be easier to make mono port. –  arbiter Jun 29 '09 at 13:55
    
@arbiter: thx, since these are no criterias for our application I think it's ok to use the registry... I read on several places not to use the registry and that it is recommended to use config files, generally, but I didn't find a true explanation why the registry shouldn't be used. (I don't have the feel that it's a good idea to move configuration information from existing config files into the registry but I don't really have arguments against it. I would like to keep configuration at a single place.) –  Inno Jun 29 '09 at 14:14
1  
From Win95 through WinXP storing to the registry became comfortable. Going forward however Vista and beyond, there are now multiple registries and legacy products seem to handle the underlying changes in odd ways. It's no longer a good practice to be registry dependent. –  Dan Blair Jun 29 '09 at 14:37
1  
"I didn't find a true explanation why the registry shouldn't be used" What other reason do you need than Microsoft is in the process of making the registry obsolete? –  Dunk Jun 29 '09 at 14:53

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