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import net.sf.json.*;

public class JSONDemo {

/**
 * @param args
 */
public static void main(String[] args) {
    JSONObject mainObj = new JSONObject();

    JSONObject jObj1 = new JSONObject();
    JSONObject jObj2 = new JSONObject();

    JSONArray jA1 = new JSONArray();        
    JSONArray jA2 = new JSONArray();

    JSONArray mainArray= new JSONArray();

    jObj1.accumulate("id", 17);
    jObj1.accumulate("name", "Alex");
    jObj1.accumulate("children", jA1);

    mainArray.add(jObj1);

    jObj2.accumulate("id", 94);
    jObj2.accumulate("name", "Steve");
    jObj2.accumulate("children", jA2);

    //Adding the new object to jObj1 via jA1

    jA1.add(jObj2);

    mainObj.accumulate("ccgs", mainArray);
    System.out.println(mainObj.toString());     
}    

}

The output I got is

{"ccgs":[{"id":17,"name":"Alex","children":[]}]}

I wanted the jObj2 within the children key of jObj1.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Apparently the node creation order has an impact on the generated string. If you change the object creation order, beginning with the children, the Json is correct.

See that code :

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // first create the child node
        JSONObject jObj2 = new JSONObject();
        jObj2.accumulate("id", 94);
        jObj2.accumulate("name", "Steve");
        jObj2.accumulate("children", new JSONArray());

        // then create the parent's children array
        JSONArray jA1 = new JSONArray(); 
        jA1.add(jObj2);

        // then create the parent
        JSONObject jObj1 = new JSONObject();
        jObj1.accumulate("id", 17);
        jObj1.accumulate("name", "Alex");
        jObj1.accumulate("children", jA1);

        // then create the main array
        JSONArray mainArray = new JSONArray();
        mainArray.add(jObj1);

        // then create the main object
        JSONObject mainObj = new JSONObject();
        mainObj.accumulate("ccgs", mainArray);

        System.out.println(mainObj);    
    }

The output is :

{"ccgs":[{"id":17,"name":"Alex","children":[{"id":94,"name":"Steve","children":[]}]}]}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the answer. –  nixsix6 May 22 '12 at 9:06

If you wanted something like this {"ccgs":[{"id":17,"name":"Alex","children":{"id":94,"name":"Steve","children":[]}}]}

Then you can do like this.

    JSONObject mainObj = new JSONObject();

    JSONObject jObj1 = new JSONObject();
    JSONObject jObj2 = new JSONObject();

    JSONArray jA1 = new JSONArray();        
    JSONArray jA2 = new JSONArray();

    JSONArray mainArray= new JSONArray();

    jObj2.accumulate("id", 94);
    jObj2.accumulate("name", "Steve");
    jObj2.accumulate("children", jA2);

    jObj1.accumulate("id", 17);
    jObj1.accumulate("name", "Alex");
    jObj1.accumulate("children", jObj2);

    mainArray.add(jObj1);



    //Adding the new object to jObj1 via jA1

    jA1.add(jObj2);

    mainObj.accumulate("ccgs", mainArray);
    System.out.println(mainObj.toString());   
share|improve this answer
1  
But what if I wanted to add one more sibling of Steve withing the children key of Alex? –  nixsix6 May 14 '12 at 11:35
    
Then you will have to add all the siblings in an array and add the array to the children node. –  Subir Kumar Sao May 14 '12 at 11:36

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