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Why is following not allowed in C++

#include <iostream>

class Sample {
public:
  void Method(char x);
  void Method(char const x);
};

void Sample::Method(char x) {
  char y = x;
}

void Sample::Method(char const x) {
  char y = x;
}

int main() {
  Sample s;
  return 0;
}
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What is the connection between your original question and your edit? The two questions seem to be unrelated. –  Luc Touraille May 14 '12 at 12:05
    
I Removed that. –  Avinash May 14 '12 at 12:12
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7 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It doesn't really answer why, but it is determined by the standard, §1.3.10

The information about a function that participates in overload resolution (13.3): the types of its parameters and, if the function is a class member, the cv- qualifiers (if any) on the function itself and the class in which the member function is declared.

This just means the cv qualifiers of the arguments are ignored in the overload resolution.

A similar (but not equivalent) example with references works:

class Sample {
public:
  void Method(char& x) {}
  void Method(const char& x) {}
};

because here the types are different, the first case being a reference to char, the second a reference to const char (as opposed to a const reference to char).

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Why is following not allowed in C++?
The reason is the very same that the compiler gives you as an compilation error:
Because they are ambiguous!

Why are these methods ambiguous?
Short answer: Because the C++ Standard says so.

What is the rationale behind these overloaded methods being ambiguous?
The compiler does not know whether the caller wants to treat the value of the passed argument as an const or not, there is no way for the compiler to determine that with the information at hand.

Note the emphasis on pass by value here, the argument is being passed by value, and hence the ambiguity. If the argument was passed by reference then the compiler knows for sure how the caller wants to treat the argument because then the actual object itself is being passed, and hence compiler can make a selection of the proper overload.

The following example gives a clearer idea to the explanation above.

Online Sample:

class Sample 
{
    public:
        void Method(char &x){}
        void Method(char const x){}
        void Method(char const &x){}
};


int main() 
{
     Sample s;
     return 0;
}
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This is still ambiguous. When it's called with a character argument, one version will copy the argument and say "OK, you can change the copy". The other will copy the argument and say "OK, you cannot change the copy." How is the compiler supposed to know whether it can or can't change a copy of something? It could do either just fine.

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When it comes to function parameters, char and char const are the same data type.

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1  
They are not the same data type. The cv qualifiers just don't get considered for overload resolution. –  juanchopanza May 14 '12 at 11:45
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because it's ambiguous when you're passing like this

s.Method('x');

what version should you think be called?

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The standard says those two declarations are equivalent (13.1.3):

Parameter declarations that differ only in the presence or absence of const and/or volatile are equivalent. That is, the const and volatile type-specifiers for each parameter type are ignored when determining which function is being declared, defined, or called.

typedef const int cInt;

int f(int);
int f(const int);            // redeclaration of f(int)
int f(int) { /* ... */ }     // definiton of f(int)
int f(cInt) { /* ... */ }    // error: redefiniton of f(int)
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http://duramecho.com/ComputerInformation/WhyHowCppConst.html

Because const denotes that variable as having a set value, that cannot be changed after declaration. It is not a different data type.

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Accessibility? How? Access qualifiers do that (private/protected/public), not const-volatile qualifiers. –  xtofl May 14 '12 at 11:39
    
as in you cannot modify the value at a later date after declaration. Maybe the term I used was not the best. Edited answer. –  Ameoo May 14 '12 at 11:41
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