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I am stuck at 1 point in my project. I am a biomedical science. So, I don't know perl programming much. I have a file that explains proteins interactions with ligands. The file looks as shown below:

H P L A    82 SER  1290  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.90
H P L A    83 SER  1301  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.93
N P L A    19 LYS   302  NZ  ---  O31  1682 GSH   106 A  3.86
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.75
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  3.02
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.03
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  2.02
N P L A    24 TYR   372  CB  ---  CG1  1670 GSH   106 A  3.68

Now you can see the are O12 in two rows. Similarly you can see that there are two CB2 as well. These O12 and CB2 are atom symbols. O12 means oxygen 12 in an atom. Now I need to calculate how many different atom symbols are there in file. I have to use perl script to do that. I am reading this file line by line using perl. while (my $line = <MYFILE>) { }; Now, I need to calculate how many different atom symbols are there while reading the file line by line. I hope I am clear enough to explain my problem. Waiting for a kind reply...

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you can use substr or regex for this –  gaussblurinc May 14 '12 at 12:04
    
read about hash and make something like this: if ($line =~ m/(?:-+)\s+(\w+)\s+/) { # in $1 variable u can find your O12 } –  gaussblurinc May 14 '12 at 12:07
    
Don't use html tags to format your input, use the code formatting provided by Markup. Is this input delimited in any special way? Tabs, fixed width? How can it vary? Can fields be empty? This information is crucial to solving the problem correctly. –  TLP May 14 '12 at 12:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How the problem is best solved depends on how your data is delimited. As it looks like fixed width, I'll present that solution first:

use strict;
use warnings;

my %atom;
while (<DATA>) {
    my (undef,$atom) = unpack "A34A4 ", $_;
    $atom{$atom}++;
}

print scalar keys %atom;

__DATA__
H P L A    82 SER  1290  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.90
H P L A    83 SER  1301  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.93
N P L A    19 LYS   302  NZ  ---  O31  1682 GSH   106 A  3.86
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.75
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  3.02
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.03
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  2.02
N P L A    24 TYR   372  CB  ---  CG1  1670 GSH   106 A  3.68

Note here that I estimated the offset used by unpack, so you may need to tweak that to fit your data.

If your data is tab-delimited, you'll need to split on tab, or better yet use Text::CSV to parse your data. Basic script is the same:

use Text::CSV;

my $csv = Text::CSV->new({
        binary => 1,
        sep_char => "\t",
    });
my %atom;
while (<DATA>) {
    $csv->parse($_);
    my $atom = ($csv->fields())[9];
    next unless defined $atom;
    $atom{$atom}++;
}

You can also use the loop condition while (my $aref = $csv->getline(*DATA)), which is more efficient, but also breaks if your csv data is not consistent.

A simpler and possibly as valid (depending on how complex your data can be) solution is using split:

while (<DATA>) {
    my $atom = (split /\t/)[9];  # implicitly splits $_
    $atom{$atom}++;
}

If your data is space delimited, simply remove /\t/ from the above.

Note that I assumed all spaces were tabs in your input, so if they are not, my count may need to be tweaked.

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Thank you to all of you who helped, specially TLP. I am grateful to all of you. Cheers –  shpr May 14 '12 at 13:29
    
Sorry to bother you again I am facing another problem. I have to do two task alongside while reading file line by line. I don't know how to combine them in one code. Can u help?</br> while (my $line = <MYFILE>) { if ($line =~ /$ligandcode/) { $count++; $first=substr($line, 0,1); if($first=~ /^[H]/) { $Hbonding++; } } } and the one TLP has sent me which is my %atom; while (<FILE>) { my (undef,$atom) = unpack "A34A4 ", $_; $atom{$atom}++; } print scalar keys %atom; –  shpr May 14 '12 at 13:42
    
@shpr If you have a new problem, post a new question. Though those two snippets of code can be combined easily if you just use the same loop condition. –  TLP May 14 '12 at 13:46
    
To make it more clear. The first code I sent is to count H in first column and second is to see different atom symbol. I want that program to read line by line, doing both tasks side by side. Thanks for helping –  shpr May 14 '12 at 13:50
    
@shpr I know what you asked, and I told you how to solve it. The difference is the loop condition, the first one uses my $line = <MYFILE>, the other $_ = <FILE>. Just like in math, you perform substitutions and then you can reduce both sides of the equation of identical elements and merge them into one. –  TLP May 14 '12 at 14:17

Have a look at this Perl Cookbook recipe.

While you're reading the file line by line you want to split/extract the atom symbols and count them in a hash.

use strict;
use warnings;
# open FILE goes here...
my %seen; # we use this to count
while (<FILE>) {
  m/--[>-]\s+(\w+)\s/; # fetch the atom symbol after arrow-thing
  $seen{$1}++;
}
close FILE;
print scalar keys %seen; # number of unique atom symbols
print join ', ', keys %seen; # List as string
share|improve this answer
    
@ObjectiveC-oder: Thanks for the code. I ll try it now. –  shpr May 14 '12 at 13:03

Or in perl:

#!/usr/bin/perl

while(my $line = <DATA>){
  my $atom = (split / +/, $line)[9];

  $atoms{$atom}++;
}

print "$_: $atoms{$_}\n" for keys %atoms;

__DATA__
H P L A    82 SER  1290  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.90
H P L A    83 SER  1301  N   -->  O12  1668 GSH   106 A  2.93
N P L A    19 LYS   302  NZ  ---  O31  1682 GSH   106 A  3.86
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.75
N P L A    22 CYS   348  CB  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  3.02
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  CB2  1677 GSH   106 A  3.03
N P L A    22 CYS   349  SG  ---  SG2  1678 GSH   106 A  2.02
N P L A    24 TYR   372  CB  ---  CG1  1670 GSH   106 A  3.68
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@loldop: Thanks for the suggestion, I ll try that. Is to specify the O12? because I need to count all different atom symbols like it should count all O12 as 1 and all CB2 as 1. so, like in above example i can say there are 5 different atom symbols like O12, O31, CB2, SG2, CG1. I am new to this community, so I will try my best to explain my problem. –  shpr May 14 '12 at 12:59

In command line (no perl):

cat yourfile | awk '{print $10}' | sort | uniq | wc -l

Works on your input.

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@TLP: Yes this file contains spaces and tabs. I don't know how to explain it here. [link] ebi.ac.uk/thornton-srv/databases/pdbsum/1b4q/grow.out. This link contains the original file. –  shpr May 14 '12 at 13:01
    
@shpr This is the wrong place for your comment. You have posted a comment on breqwas answer, not your question. I am not notified of such comments. I am sure you can explain your format without pointing to an external file. I see no tabs at all in that file. –  TLP May 14 '12 at 13:09

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