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I have a table that has a date field (schedule_date) and a varchar field (schedule time) holding the an hour number (0..23) as a String.

I've got two queries:

Query 1) Returns any upcoming schedules:
a) anything with date > today
b) AND anything where the date matches the current date but the hour > the current hour

Query 2) Returns 1 record - the last run schedule time

I've been trying to figure out how to combine the two, but I'm not sure how to deal with the two problems involved that go past a simple union. I'm guessing sub queries would be involved but I'm at the limit of my SQL skills here.

Problem 1): Only the 2nd query needs "LIMIT 1" - how to apply just to query 2?

Problem 2): The second query needs a DESC order for the LIMIT 1 to work correctly but I need the results of both queries combined in ASC order

note: adding + 1 hour to current time below (store dates are in EST, server returns CST for NOW)

QUERY 1: Returning any upcoming schedules

SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date > DATE(NOW())
UNION 
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date = DATE(NOW())
AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) > (HOUR(CURRENT_TIME()) + 1)

QUERY 2: Return the last turn schedule (needs the DESC order for the LIMIT 1 to position on the last schedule)

SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date = DATE(NOW())
AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) < (HOUR(CURRENT_TIME()) + 1)
UNION
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date < DATE(NOW())
ORDER BY schedule_date DESC, schedule_time DESC
LIMIT 1

edit: corrected ORDER above (should have been by DESC)

If combined, need to sort the results of both combined into ASC:

ORDER BY schedule_date ASC, schedule_time ASC

Thank You!

share|improve this question
    
Unrelated, but why not useone field to store date and time? –  jadkik94 May 14 '12 at 12:16
    
Yeah that would be nice. :) I have no idea why that decision was made except it probably has something to do with original GUI design where only even hours (1:00, 2:00, 3:00) were selectable. Maybe there wasn't a dateTime picker in use that could deal with picking a date and only an even hour or someone didn't have sense to combine both separate choices into a single dateTime before storing in the db. Really it just means any logic applied to the two fields needs two conditions instead of one, so it's not really a big deal. –  Reno May 14 '12 at 12:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

First of all, you could simply UNION the two queries, only the second one would need to be enclosed in parentheses:

SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date > DATE(NOW())
UNION 
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date = DATE(NOW())
AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) > (HOUR(CURRENT_TIME()) + 1)
UNION ALL
(
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date = DATE(NOW())
AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) < (HOUR(CURRENT_TIME()) + 1)
UNION
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date < DATE(NOW())
ORDER BY schedule_date DESC, schedule_time DESC
LIMIT 1
)
ORDER BY schedule_date ASC, schedule_time ASC

But you could simplify both queries by converting your UNIONs into single SELECTs that use OR-ed conditions, like this:

  1. SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
    FROM special_schedules
    WHERE schedule_date > DATE(NOW())
       OR schedule_date = DATE(NOW()) AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) > HOUR(CURRENT_TIME())
    
  2. SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
    FROM special_schedules
    WHERE schedule_date < DATE(NOW())
       OR schedule_date = DATE(NOW()) AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) < HOUR(CURRENT_TIME())
    ORDER BY schedule_date DESC, schedule_time DESC
    LIMIT 1
    

And the combined query would then be this:

SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date > DATE(NOW())
   OR schedule_date = DATE(NOW()) AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) > HOUR(CURRENT_TIME())
UNION ALL
(
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE schedule_date < DATE(NOW())
   OR schedule_date = DATE(NOW()) AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) < HOUR(CURRENT_TIME())
ORDER BY schedule_date DESC, schedule_time DESC
LIMIT 1
)
ORDER BY schedule_date ASC, schedule_time ASC

And there's another option, which involves converting schedule_date and schedule_time into a single DATETIME-looking value, like this:

CONCAT(schedule_date, ' ', schedule_time, ':00')

The resulting query in this case might look like this:

SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE CONCAT(schedule_date, ' ', schedule_time, ':00') > (NOW() + INTERVAL 1 HOUR)

UNION ALL

(
SELECT schedule_date,  CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
FROM special_schedules
WHERE CONCAT(schedule_date, ' ', schedule_time, ':00') < (NOW() + INTERVAL 1 HOUR)
ORDER BY schedule_date DESC, schedule_time DESC
LIMIT 1
)

ORDER BY schedule_date ASC, schedule_time ASC
share|improve this answer
    
awesome info - thanks! –  Reno May 14 '12 at 17:24
SELECT schedule_date, schedule_time
FROM (( SELECT schedule_date, CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) AS schedule_time
        FROM special_schedules
        WHERE schedule_date = DATE(NOW())
            AND CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL) < (HOUR(CURRENT_TIME()) + 1))
        UNION
    (   SELECT schedule_date, CONVERT(schedule_time, DECIMAL)
        FROM special_schedules
        WHERE schedule_date < DATE(NOW())
        ORDER BY schedule_date DESC
        LIMIT 1)) AS h
ORDER BY schedule_date DESC

This should do what you're after.

share|improve this answer
    
Negative sorry. That just returns the same result as running query 2 by itself since the LIMIT 1 is applied to both in the the subquery. –  Reno May 14 '12 at 12:42
    
Tried adding parentheses. Any difference? –  Robin Castlin May 14 '12 at 12:49

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