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class person
{
[Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the FirstName of person")]
string FirstName{get; set ;}

[Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the LastName of person")]
string LastName{get; set ;}
}

class Student
{
string FirstName{get; set ;}
string LastName{get; set ;}
}

Person p = new Person();
Student s = new Student();

I want to copy the attributes from person to Student; How can it?

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Are those properties private? –  Mr Lister May 14 '12 at 12:17
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4 Answers 4

You could use inheritance to make this easier.

class Student : Person
{

}
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This is the 'right' OO way of doing this, but note that the attributes will only be 'copied' if the RequiredAttribute class is flagged as inherited: [AttributeUsage(AttributeTargets.Property, Inherited = true)]. If it isn't then Student will inherit the properties from Person but not their [Required] attributes. –  Keith May 14 '12 at 12:28
    
@Keith RequiredAttribute has that. –  Daniel A. White May 14 '12 at 12:33
    
System.ComponentModel.DataAnnotations.RequiredAttribute does, Microsoft.Build.Framework.RequiredAttribute does not, and RequiredAttribute could be their own custom one too. While I think the first is the most likely I still think the clarification is worthwhile. –  Keith May 14 '12 at 13:22
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I assume that by "attribute", you actually mean "property"...

There's no "automatic" way to do it, you need to copy the values manually.

Person p = ...
Student s = new Student { FirstName  = p.FirstName, LastName = p.LastName };

Depending on the context, you could also use an object mapper like AutoMapper

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The OP did say copy "from one class to another". Do you think they meant "instance" instead of "class"? And as the properties are private, you can't simply copy them from the outside, because you don't have access. I don't think your reply answers the question at all. –  Mr Lister May 14 '12 at 12:25
    
@MrLister, I don't think the OP posted his actual code. It wouldn't make sense to make such properties private. Anyway, that's how I understood the question, which wasn't exactly clear... but I might be wrong. –  Thomas Levesque May 14 '12 at 12:27
    
I may be wrong, in which case, sorry. But if you need to assume that the OP means "property" instead of "attribute", AND "instance" instead of "class", AND that the properties are actually public, AND that with all your assumptions, the question becomes horribly simplistic, then I think he means it the way he says it. Besides, the example does have attributes in it... –  Mr Lister May 14 '12 at 13:17
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If Student inherits Person, it will both have the properties, and both their attributes.

class Person
{
    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the FirstName of person")]
    string FirstName { get; set; }

    [Required(ErrorMessage = "Please enter the LastName of person")]
    string LastName { get; set; }
}

class Student : Person
{
}
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You could use reflection like this :

foreach (var getter in s.GetType().GetProperties())
{
    var newData = getter.GetValue(newProject, null);
    var setter = p.GetType().GetProperty(prop.Name)
    setter.SetValue(p, newData, null);
}
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That will copy the values of the properties, but do nothing about their attributes. –  Keith May 14 '12 at 12:29
    
I figured that's what he wanted.(His question wasn't that elaborate) –  Kristof May 14 '12 at 12:31
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