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Put simply, I can create 2 dependency properties in a WPF control and put code in each property change notification to change the other property (i.e PropA change sets PropB and PropB change sets PropA).

I would expect this to disappear up its own backside but WPF seems to handle it nicely. That's actually very handy for my purposes but I can't find this behaviour documented anywhere.

So what's going on? Does the WPF dependency property change notification system guard against reentrancy?

Representative code follows:

XAML:

<Window x:Class="WPFReentrancy1.MainWindow"
        xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
        xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
        Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <TextBox Text="{Binding PropB, UpdateSourceTrigger=PropertyChanged}"/>

    </Grid>
</Window>

Code behind:

 public partial class MainWindow : Window
    {

        public string PropA
        {
            get { return (string)GetValue(PropAProperty); }
            set { SetValue(PropAProperty, value); }
        }
        public static readonly DependencyProperty PropAProperty =
                        DependencyProperty.Register("PropA", typeof (string), typeof (MainWindow),new UIPropertyMetadata("0", PropAChanged));


        public string PropB
        {
            get { return (string)GetValue(PropBProperty); }
            set { SetValue(PropBProperty, value); }
        }

        public static readonly DependencyProperty PropBProperty =
            DependencyProperty.Register("PropB", typeof (string), typeof (MainWindow), new UIPropertyMetadata("", PropBChanged));

        private static void PropBChanged(DependencyObject lDependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
        {
            ((MainWindow) lDependencyObject).PropA = (string) lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs.NewValue;
        }


        private static void PropAChanged(DependencyObject lDependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
        {
            ((MainWindow) lDependencyObject).PropB =
                double.Parse((string) lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs.NewValue).ToString("0.000");
        }


        public MainWindow()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
            DataContext = this;
            PropA = "1.123";
        }
    }
share|improve this question
    
don't have concrete answer, but suppose that: considering the WPF make recursive flow along the element's tree and associated properties too, it just "saves" (for concrete event) which nodes it has already passed and fired notification, so skip them if met them another time again. –  Tigran May 14 '12 at 12:36

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Those callbacks are only fired if the property changed, your code does not create an infinite loop of different values.

Try this and you will get a SO exception:

private static readonly Random _random = new Random();
private static void PropBChanged(DependencyObject lDependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
{
    ((MainWindow)lDependencyObject).PropA = _random.Next().ToString();
}
private static void PropAChanged(DependencyObject lDependencyObject, DependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs lDependencyPropertyChangedEventArgs)
{
    ((MainWindow)lDependencyObject).PropB = _random.Next().ToString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
I guess the clue is in the name! I was assuming the notification would be fired regardless but I've just done a quick test and it appears that this is exactly what is happening. –  MarcE May 14 '12 at 12:46

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