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Given is the following class hierarchy:

Class Diagram

Additional info:

  • The Person class is not abstract.
  • A person could be a User, a Manager or something else that implements the IPerson interface.
  • The Person class must not have any knowledge about its child classes.
  • A child class could reside in another assembly.
  • It is also possible that a Person is a User and a Manager as wel. In that case the UserRepository must return a User object for the given PersonId and the ManagerRepository must return a Manager for the same PersonId.
  • It must also be possible to get the Person (base) part for all objects that implement the IPerson interface via a PersonRepository.

How can this be mapped within NHibernate?

We are using FluentNHibernate 1.2 and NHibernate 3.1.

In our current situation each class has its own table. So we have a Person table, a User table and a Manager table.

I have already tried the following options without success:

  • Mapping this with inheritence mapping (one table per subclass);
  • A join with Person in the mapping for User and Manager (without inheritance mapping);
  • A HasOne mapping with Person in the User and Manager mapping (without the join and inheritance mapping);
share|improve this question
    
Can you explain more why mapping with inheritance wouldn't work? That is the method I would use, and have used, in similar situations. –  HackedByChinese May 14 '12 at 12:55
    
Because then I'll get an exception in the case there is already a User object saved and I want to save a Manager with the same Id (id = 2): "a different object with the same identifier value was already associated with the session: 2" This is thrown when NHibernate wants to store the data in the Person table. –  Patrick Koorevaar May 14 '12 at 13:23
    
OK, I apologize; I jumped the gun and skimped over the fact that you want to be able to promote/demote subclasses. –  HackedByChinese May 14 '12 at 16:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you've no doubt discovered, it is easy enough to map inheritance like this: Person -> User, or Person -> Manager, or Person -> Manager -> User (or alternately, Person -> Manager -> User).

NHibernate does not allow you to promote/demote to or from a subclass. You'd have to run native SQL to promote or demote.

However, if you followed my initial "map" of your inheritance, you should have had an epiphany that using subclasses for what you are trying to do is an inappropriate solution for what you are trying to model. And that's only with two subclasses! What happens when you add more roles?

What you have is a Person, who can be a member of any number of roles, where roles are extensible. Consider this solution (Source on github: https://github.com/HackedByChinese/NHibernateComposition):

(Assume we have an Entity abstract class which handles equality, where to objects of the same type with the same ID are considered equal)

Project: Models

public class Person : Entity, IPerson
{
    public virtual string FirstName { get; set; }

    public virtual string LastName { get; set; }

    public virtual IList<Role> Roles { get; protected set; }

    public Person()
    {
        Roles = new List<Role>();
    }

    public virtual void AddRole(Role role)
    {
        if (Roles.Contains(role)) return;

        role.Person = this;

        Roles.Add(role);
    }

    public virtual void RemoveRole(Role role)
    {
        if (!Roles.Contains(role)) return;

        role.Person = null;

        Roles.Remove(role);
    }
}

public interface IPerson
{
    string FirstName { get; set; }

    string LastName { get; set; }

    Int32 Id { get; }
}

public abstract class Role : Entity
{
    public virtual Person Person { get; set; }

    public virtual string RoleName { get; protected set; }
}

public class User : Role
{
    public virtual string LoginName { get; set; }

    public virtual string Password { get; set; }
}

Project: Models.B

public class Manager : Role
{
    public virtual string Division { get; set; }

    public virtual string Status { get; set; }
}

Project: Models.Impl

I placed fluent mappings for both projects into one to save time. There could easily be separate mapping assemblies for Models and Models.B

public class PersonMap : ClassMap<Person>
{
    public PersonMap()
    {
        Id(c => c.Id)
            .GeneratedBy.HiLo("100");

        Map(c => c.FirstName);
        Map(c => c.LastName);

        HasMany(c => c.Roles)
            .Inverse()
            .Cascade.AllDeleteOrphan();
    }
}

public class RoleMap : ClassMap<Role>
{
    public RoleMap()
    {
        Id(c => c.Id)
            .GeneratedBy.HiLo("100");

        DiscriminateSubClassesOnColumn<string>("RoleName");

        References(c => c.Person);
    }
}

public class UserMap : SubclassMap<User>
{
    public UserMap()
    {
        DiscriminatorValue("User");

        Join("User", joined =>
                         {
                             joined.Map(c => c.LoginName);
                             joined.Map(c => c.Password);
                         });
    }
}

Project: Models.Impl.Tests

[TestFixture]
public class MappingTests
{
    private ISessionFactory _factory;

    #region Setup/Teardown for fixture

    [TestFixtureSetUp]
    public void SetUpFixture()
    {
        if (File.Exists("test.db")) File.Delete("test.db");

        _factory = Fluently.Configure()
            .Database(() => SQLiteConfiguration.Standard
                                .UsingFile("test.db")
                                .ShowSql()
                                .FormatSql())
            .Mappings(mappings => mappings.FluentMappings
                                      .AddFromAssemblyOf<PersonMap>())
            .ExposeConfiguration(config =>
                                     {
                                         var exporter = new SchemaExport(config);
                                         exporter.Execute(true, true, false);
                                     })
            .BuildSessionFactory();
    }

    [TestFixtureTearDown]
    public void TearDownFixture()
    {
        _factory.Close();
    }

    #endregion

    #region Setup/Teardown for each test

    [SetUp]
    public void SetUpTest()
    {
    }

    [TearDown]
    public void TearDownTest()
    {
    }

    #endregion

    [Test]
    public void Should_create_and_retrieve_Person()
    {
        var expected = new Person
        {
            FirstName = "Mike",
            LastName = "G"
        };

        using (var session = _factory.OpenSession())
        using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            session.SaveOrUpdate(expected);

            tx.Commit();
        }

        expected.Id.Should().BeGreaterThan(0);

        using (var session = _factory.OpenSession())
        using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            var actual = session.Get<Person>(expected.Id);

            actual.Should().NotBeNull();
            actual.ShouldHave().AllProperties().EqualTo(expected);
        }

    }

    [Test]
    public void Should_create_and_retrieve_Roles()
    {
        // Arrange
        var expected = new Person
                         {
                             FirstName = "Mike",
                             LastName = "G"
                         };

        var expectedManager = new Manager
                           {
                               Division = "One",
                               Status = "Active"
                           };
        var expectedUser = new User
                               {
                                   LoginName = "mikeg",
                                   Password = "test123"
                               };

        Person actual;

        // Act
        expected.AddRole(expectedManager);
        expected.AddRole(expectedUser);

        using (var session = _factory.OpenSession())
        using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            session.SaveOrUpdate(expected);

            tx.Commit();
        }

        using (var session = _factory.OpenSession())
        using (var tx = session.BeginTransaction())
        {
            actual = session.Get<Person>(expected.Id);

            // ignore this; just forcing the Roles collection to be lazy loaded before I kill the session.
            actual.Roles.Count();
        }

        // Assert
        actual.Roles.OfType<Manager>().First().Should().Be(expectedManager);
        actual.Roles.OfType<Manager>().First().ShouldHave().AllProperties().But(c => c.Person).EqualTo(expectedManager);

        actual.Roles.OfType<User>().First().Should().Be(expectedUser);
        actual.Roles.OfType<User>().First().ShouldHave().AllProperties().But(c => c.Person).EqualTo(expectedUser);
    }
}

If you want to constrain a Person to one instance of a particular role, just put a unique index and mess with the Equals method to check if Id is the same OR RoleName is the same.

You can easily get or check a user's role of any type:

if (person.Roles.OfType<User>().Any())
{
   var user = person.Roles.OfType<User>().FirstOrDefault();
} 

You can also query roles directly to look up their Person:

var peopleWhoAreManagersInDistrictOne = (from role in session.Query<Manager>()
                                         where role.District == "One"
                                         select role.Person);

You can also see that other assemblies can define additional roles. Manager is in a different assembly than Models.

So, you can see this will do everything you want plus more, despite the fact that it uses a different approach.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your comprehensive answer! I am trying to integrate this in our solution. As far as I can see now is that there is a problem with the join mapping in the SQL query. The wrong id is used by NHibernate (user0_.Id instead of user0_.PersonId): select TOP (@p0) user0_.Id as Id4_, user0_.PersonId as PersonId4_, user0_1_.Username as Username6_, user0_1_.Password as Password6_ from [Role] user0_ inner join [User] user0_1_ on user0_.Id=user0_1_.PersonId where user0_.RoleName='User' and user0_1_.Username=@p1 The Person reference is stored in PersonId of the Role table, not in Id. –  Patrick Koorevaar May 15 '12 at 13:35
    
I'll have to try it, but you should be able to set Role.Person as the (foreign) key for role. Of course, you'll also need to change Role's base. In my example, Entity is the base; you'd either have to remove that and implement GetHashCode()/Equals() separately, or use Entity<Person>. Or just live with the fact that each Role also has its own identifier (which may not be such a bad thing). –  HackedByChinese May 15 '12 at 13:44
    
My bad, I need to do more refactoring in our solution (especially at the database level). After a closer look at your example project (refactored it to use MSSQL db), I'm convinced this is the way to go. Many thanks again! –  Patrick Koorevaar May 16 '12 at 8:47

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