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I have text like this:

00:00 stuff
00:01 more stuff
multi line
  and going
00:02 still 
    have

So, I don't have a block end, just a new block start.

I want to recursively get all blocks:

1 = 00:00 stuff
2 = 00:01 more stuff
multi line
  and going

etc

The bellow code only gives me this:

$VAR1 = '00:00';
$VAR2 = '';
$VAR3 = '00:01';
$VAR4 = '';
$VAR5 = '00:02';
$VAR6 = '';

What am I doing wrong?

my $text = '00:00 stuff
00:01 more stuff
multi line
 and going
00:02 still 
have
    ';
my @array = $text =~ m/^([0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2})(.*?)/gms;
print Dumper(@array);
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

This should do the trick. Beginning of next \d\d:\d\d is treated as block end.

$Str = '00:00 stuff
00:01 more stuff
multi line
  and going
00:02 still 
    have
00:03 still 
    have' ;

@Blocks = ($Str =~ m#(\d\d:\d\d.+?(?:(?=\d\d:\d\d)|$))#gs);

print join "--\n", @Blocks;
share|improve this answer
1  
Your non-capturing parens (?: ... ) are redundant here, as (?= ...) can also use alternations. Also, I notice you are still not writing strict compliant code, which in my book is bad, since it encourages bad practice. – TLP May 14 '12 at 13:05
1  
I have given sufficient explanation about use(ing) strict in the other thread. Do you mind stop doing this? – tuxuday May 14 '12 at 13:10
1  
Yes, I do mind. Would you mind stop posting non-strict code? This is a learning environment, it doesn't cost you anything to post code that encourages good practice, now does it? – TLP May 14 '12 at 13:19
2  
No one cares what you said in another thread. How would they know to look there? Remember, StackOverflow syndicates its content, so your answer is likely to show up all by itself on some other website. – brian d foy May 14 '12 at 20:19

Version 5.10.0 introduced named capture groups that are useful for matching nontrivial patterns.

(?'NAME'pattern)
(?<NAME>pattern)

A named capture group. Identical in every respect to normal capturing parentheses () but for the additional fact that the group can be referred to by name in various regular expression constructs (such as \g{NAME}) and can be accessed by name after a successful match via %+ or %-. See perlvar for more details on the %+ and %- hashes.

If multiple distinct capture groups have the same name then the $+{NAME} will refer to the leftmost defined group in the match.

The forms (?'NAME'pattern) and (?<NAME>pattern) are equivalent.

Named capture groups allow us to name subpatterns within the regex as in the following.

use 5.10.0;  # named capture buffers

my $block_pattern = qr/
  (?<time>(?&_time)) (?&_sp) (?<desc>(?&_desc))

  (?(DEFINE)
    # timestamp at logical beginning-of-line
    (?<_time> (?m:^) [0-9][0-9]:[0-9][0-9])

    # runs of spaces or tabs
    (?<_sp> [ \t]+)

    # description is everything through the end of the record
    (?<_desc>
      # s switch makes . match newline too
      (?s: .+?)

      # terminate before optional whitespace (which we remove) followed
      # by either end-of-string or the start of another block
      (?= (?&_sp)? (?: $ | (?&_time)))
    )
  )
/x;

Use it as in

my $text = '00:00 stuff
00:01 more stuff
multi line
 and going
00:02 still
have
    ';

while ($text =~ /$block_pattern/g) {
  print "time=[$+{time}]\n",
        "desc=[[[\n",
        $+{desc},
        "]]]\n\n";
}

Output:

$ ./blocks-demo
time=[00:00]
desc=[[[
stuff
]]]

time=[00:01]
desc=[[[
more stuff
multi line
 and going
]]]

time=[00:02]
desc=[[[
still
have
]]]
share|improve this answer
1  
Really great example of modern Perl5 re :) – XoR May 14 '12 at 20:45

Your problem is that .*? is non-greedy in the same way that .* is greedy. When it is not forced, it matches as little as possible, which in this case is the empty string.

So, you'll need something after the non-greedy match to anchor up your capture. I came up with this regex:

my @array = $text =~ m/\n?([0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}.*?)(?=\n[0-9]{2}:|$)/gs;

As you see, I removed the /m option to accurately be able to match end of string in the look-ahead assertion.

You might also consider this solution:

my @array = split /(?=[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2})/, $text;
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