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I'm having some trouble converting a parameter:

I have this structure:

class XMLCO 
{...};

class CO: public XMLCO 
{...};

And my problem lies in this class in the constructor:

class ProcessUnit
{
public:
    ProcessUnit( const CO& co );
private:
    NetComm _ipComm;
};

The object _ipComm (of type NetComm) needs to be initialize with a XMLCO, but in this constructor I'm only given a CO which inherit XMLCO, so I though I could do some sort of a downcast like so in the constructor:

ProcessUnit::ProcessUnit( const CO& co )
{
    CO temp = const_cast<CO>( co ); // to remove the const -- THIS LINE CAUSE THE PROBLEM (it gives me this error: the type in a const_cast must be a pointer or reference to an object type 
    CO* ptrTemp = &temp; // to make it a pointer
    XMLCO* xmlcc = dynamic_cast<IOXMLDescCreationContext*>( ptrTemp );

    _ipComm = new IONetworkComm( *xmlcc );
}

What I want to know is if there's a simpler way of doing this (without changing anything to the generic structure) or if I'm doing something wrong.

Thanks

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2  
for const_cast the original and the target type must match with the exception of the const specifier. Keep the "&" in the type declaration. –  Adriano Repetti May 14 '12 at 13:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The object _ipComm (of type NetComm) needs to be initialize with a XMLCO, but in this constructor I'm only given a CO which inherit XMLCO, so I though I could do some sort of a downcast

In your case you cannot cast down, only up. Luckily for you, this cast is implicit. Consequently, there’s nothing left for you to do. You can just assign:

CO temp = co;

Note, though, that this copies the object. Is this really what you want? Furthermore, removing const is probably not only unnecessary, but wrong. Even if you corrected the syntax in your code, this would still not work. To diagnose this properly, you’d need to post the other definitions though.

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1  
+1. Also, it might be easier to say specifically that Co temp = co; is perfectly valid explicitly. –  Puppy May 14 '12 at 13:27
    
+1 But I'm not sure this is what he wants, without the reference he may get a copy of the original data –  Adriano Repetti May 14 '12 at 13:46
    
@Adriano That’s what I’ve explicitly mentioned in my answer, too. –  Konrad Rudolph May 14 '12 at 13:48
    
Sorry, I'm getting lazy...my eyes started to read every odd line! ;) –  Adriano Repetti May 14 '12 at 13:53

Don't use a const_cast as it's not necessary here - It looks like your problem is not to do with the constness of the parameter as _ipComm will presumably by initialised with a copy of co.

The problem may be that the constructor of IONetworkComm takes a non-const object. If that's the case and it's not a mistake then it's telling you something about the design of IONetworkComm - namely that it needs to be initialised from a non-const object. Maybe you should reflect that in the constructor for your ProcessUnit class ? Maybe it should be:

ProcessUnit( CO& co ); 
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