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I have the following code fork()'s 2 children from a common parent and implements a pipeline between them. When I call the wait() function in the parent once only the program runs perfectly. However if I try to call the wait() function twice (to reap from both the children), the program does nothing and must be force exited.

Can someone tell me why I can't wait for both children here?

int main()
{
    int status;
    int pipeline[2];
    pipe(pipeline);

    pid_t pid_A, pid_B;

    if( !(pid_A = fork()) )
    {
        dup2(pipeline[1], 1);
        close(pipeline[0]);
        close(pipeline[1]);
        execl("/bin/ls", "ls", 0);
    }

    if( !(pid_B = fork()) )
    {
        dup2(pipeline[0], 0);
        close(pipeline[0]);
        close(pipeline[1]);
        execl("/usr/bin/wc", "wc", 0);
    }

    wait(&status);
    wait(&status);
}
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1  
Hm, I'll give it a shot. Even if wait did wait for all processes, the next wait call should simply return -1 and the program should continue uninterrupted... –  Bugalugs Nash May 14 '12 at 13:29
    
True. All I can think of then is that the wc process hasn't actually died - are both child processes definitely terminated? –  Rup May 14 '12 at 13:31
    
waitpid didn't work either. Have both processes terminated? The fact that when I exclude the second wait statement the program runs perfectly suggests to me that wc does its job properly, but I'm not sure if this means it has terminated properly. Is there a way I can check that? –  Bugalugs Nash May 14 '12 at 13:34
1  
Open a second console and try ps fu to see all of your current running processes. –  Rup May 14 '12 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to close both ends of the pipe in the parent after you fork the children. The problem is that output of ls is going to the parent, and the wc is waiting for input. So the first wait cleans up the ls, but the second is waiting for wc which is blocked on a pipe that's not receiving data.

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Process B (wc) does not terminate until it receives end-of-file on its input stream. The other end of the pipe is shared as both the output stream of process A, and as pipeline[1] in the parent process, so you will need to close(pipeline[1]) in the parent process before waiting for process B.

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