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Suppose I have this array of hashes:

[
{"href"=>"https://company.campfirenow.com", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"campfire"},
{"href"=>"https://basecamp.com/123456789/api/v1", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"bcx"}, 
{"href"=>"https://company.highrisehq.com", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"highrise"}
]

How can I parse the "href" value of the hash where "product"=>"bcx"

Is there any easy way to do this in Ruby?

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1  
Edited the question because it doesn't have anything to do with JSON. –  Niklas B. May 14 '12 at 13:35

1 Answer 1

up vote 26 down vote accepted
ary = [
  {"href"=>"https://company.campfirenow.com", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"campfire"},
  {"href"=>"https://basecamp.com/123456789/api/v1", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"bcx"}, 
  {"href"=>"https://company.highrisehq.com", "name"=>"Company", "id"=>123456789, "product"=>"highrise"}
]

p ary.find { |h| h['product'] == 'bcx' }['href']
# => "https://basecamp.com/123456789/api/v1"

Note that this only works if the element exists. Otherwise you will be calling the subscription operator [] on nil, which will raise an exception, so you might want to check for that first:

if h = ary.find { |h| h['product'] == 'bcx' }
  p h['href']
else
  puts 'Not found!'
end

If you need to perform that operation multiple times, you should build yourself a data structure for faster lookup:

href_by_product = Hash[ary.map { |h| h.values_at('product', 'href') }]
p href_by_product['campfire'] # => "https://company.campfirenow.com"
p href_by_product['bcx']      # => "https://basecamp.com/123456789/api/v1"
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2  
+1 for the hash suggestion. –  Michael Kohl May 14 '12 at 13:42
    
Perfect! Didn't know .find was a method you could call. Really helps. –  brian weinreich May 14 '12 at 13:50
5  
@BrianW: Rule #1 of Ruby Programming: learn the methods of Enumerable. Then, learn them again. –  Jörg W Mittag May 14 '12 at 14:13
    
nitpick: find/detect + get has the typical problem of non-match + boom. So in Ruby, having no list-comprehensions built-in, I'd write, when using ick: ary.detect { |h| h['product'] == 'bcx' }.maybe['href']. When using facets: ary.map_detect { |h| h["href"] if h['product'] == 'bcx' } –  tokland May 14 '12 at 14:17
    
@tokland: Sure, this only works if the element exists. That was an assumption of mine that I didn't state explicitly, thanks for pointing it out. –  Niklas B. May 14 '12 at 14:50

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