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I am working on a MVC 3 application that will be hosted in a web-farm with a multi-worker process setup. There are about a dozen variables that are being stored in Session but are getting lost due to the IIS setup.

By getting lost I mean that when the Logon process succeeds I see through logging that I have set the Session variables but then after the Redirect action and on the landing Controller Action the Session variables are often empty. I'm not sure if this is related but this is in a HTTPS.

We are looking at the possibility of moving our user-specific settings that are stored in Session out to some other mechanism but there is one variable that I won't be able to do that with. Given the above deployment environment I have the following questions.

  1. Are cookies my only (best?) alternative to storing Session variables for user-specific settings?
  2. If so is there a secure mechanism for writing cookies so they cannot be manipulated and can still be read in a multi-server environment?
  3. As I understand it System.Runtime.Caching suffers from the same problem when ran in the above IIS configuration. Is that true?
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Can't you keep settings into a database? Or you need them being cached in runtime? –  abatishchev May 14 '12 at 13:56
    
I am planning on going that route however when using CSLA as my underlying data provider I need to provide a configuration setting to get at that data, kind of cart horse scenario. This is the value I'm trying to find alternatives to for storage on a per-user basis. Thanks for your reply. –  likestoski May 14 '12 at 14:14
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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Are cookies my only (best?) alternative to storing Session variables for user-specific settings?

No - they are about the worst possible approach. Three reasons that come to mind:

  1. They can be manipulated.
  2. They travel with every request from client to server - inefficient.
  3. They will add more complications to your implementation since you'll have to start thinking about securing them in different ways.

If so is there a secure mechanism for writing cookies so they cannot be manipulated and can still be read in a multi-server environment?

See answer above.

As I understand it System.Runtime.Caching suffers from the same problem when ran in the above IIS configuration. Is that true?

True. You should be using any of the State Providers that are out of proc. You can either use Sql Server to store session data -provided your objects are serializable, obviously- or the State server mode mode="stateserver"

Read here for more details

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Thanks for your reply. Can you explain why cookies are one of the worst possible approaches? Is this because they can be manipulated or is there some other concern? Can't they be protected with encryption using the key in Machine.config? –  likestoski May 14 '12 at 14:01
    
@likestoski I added some explanation to my answer. –  Icarus May 14 '12 at 14:07
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