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I have just learned about recursion in Python and have completed assignments, one of which was to count all the elements within a list of arbitrarily nested lists. I have searched this site and the answers found all seem to use recursive calls. Since it has been taught that anything which could be expressed recursively could be expressed iteratively, and iteration is preferred in Python, how would this be accomplished without recursion or imported modules in Python 2.6 (as a learning exercise)? (A nested list itself would be counted as an element, as would its contents.) For example:

>>> def element_count(p):
...     count = 0
...     for entry in p:
...         count += 1
...         if isinstance(entry, list):            
...             count += element_count(entry)
...     return count
>>> print element_count([1, [], 3]) 
3 
>>> print element_count([1, [1, 2, [3, 4]]])
7
>>> print element_count([[[[[[[[1, 2, 3]]]]]]]])
10

How would this be written using iteration?

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13  
Iteration is preferred for things like simple loops. For inherently recursive problems like this one, recursion is better. –  interjay May 14 '12 at 14:05
    
This was more of a learning exercise than a statement of principle. And it seems to be easier to express a solution recursively. However, if the amount of needed recursive calls is unknown beforehand wouldn't this exercise be practical and necessary? –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 14:17
1  
Shouldn't element_count([1, [1, 2, [3, 4]]]) be 5? Why are you counting the sublist objects themselves as elements? –  Karl Knechtel May 14 '12 at 14:28
    
@KarlKnechtel That was the requirement for the original exercise. –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 14:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 17 down vote accepted

Here is one way to do it:

def element_count(p):
  q = p[:]
  count = 0
  while q:
    entry = q.pop()
    if isinstance(entry, list):
      q += entry
    count += 1
  return count

print element_count([1, [], 3]) 
print element_count([1, [1, 2, [3, 4]]])
print element_count([[[[[[[[1, 2, 3]]]]]]]])

The code maintains a queue of things to be looked at. Whenever the loop encounters a sub-list, it adds its contents to the queue.

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4  
Due to Python's built-in recursion limit, it actually is often a good idea to implement recursive algorithms as iterative ones with an explicit stack. I'm thinking about, e.g., DFS and similar graph algorithms, which will exceed the recursion limit for all but the tiniest problems. –  larsmans May 14 '12 at 14:13
3  
This function is destructive. It will modify the list passed to it. –  Noufal Ibrahim May 14 '12 at 14:14
1  
@NoufalIbrahim: Fair point. Code updated. –  NPE May 14 '12 at 14:17
    
This is exactly what I was looking for. So, simple... thanks! –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 14:21

Usually each recursive problem can be converted to an iterative somehow by using a stack, in this case a list:

def element_count(p):
    elements = list(p)
    count = 0
    while elements:
        entry = elements.pop()
        count += 1
        if isinstance(entry, list):
            elements.extend(entry)
    return count
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it's basically the same as @aix version, but preserves the original list –  mata May 14 '12 at 14:13
    
Why would while be used instead of for in this example? –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 14:29
1  
while elements on a list is the same as while len(elements) > 0, it will be true as long as there is something to pop in it. as we keep adding to and removing from the list within the loop, a for loop wouldn't work here. –  mata May 14 '12 at 14:32
1  
no, it does not, it just iterates over the list. in fact, if you're modifying the list while iterating over it, that can have bad sideeffects. –  mata May 14 '12 at 14:45
1  
range also gives you a list (in python2), it'S just used as an example here. you simply shouldn't modify an object you're iterating over, it will save you a lot of trouble. –  mata May 14 '12 at 15:15

You might find this version of element_count to be somewhat more powerful than the others. It can handle all containers that support iteration, and it correctly identifies recursive containers as having an infinite number of elements.

>>> def element_count(p):
    stack, pointers, count = [iter(p)], set([id(p)]), 0
    while stack:
        for item in stack.pop():
            try:
                iterator = iter(item)
            except TypeError:
                pass
            else:
                location = id(item)
                if location in pointers:
                    return float('inf')
                stack.append(iterator)
                pointers.add(location)
            count += 1
    return count

>>> element_count([1, [], 3])
3
>>> element_count([1, [1, 2, [3, 4]]])
7
>>> element_count([[[[[[[[1, 2, 3]]]]]]]])
10
>>> p = [1, 2, 3]
>>> element_count(p)
3
>>> p.append({4, 5, 6})
>>> element_count(p)
7
>>> p.append(p)
>>> element_count(p)
inf
>>> 
share|improve this answer
    
Does this not raise a SyntaxError: '{id(p)}'? –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 14:55
1  
Sorry about that! Python 3.2.3 allows literal set notation. The example above has been corrected so that it should work for you now. –  Noctis Skytower May 14 '12 at 14:59
    
This certainly accounts for more input possibilities. Interesting, thanks! –  Verbal_Kint May 14 '12 at 15:13

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