Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm new to JavaScript and would like some constructive criticism regarding a code snippet. This example searches an associative array using a value input by the user. Is there a better way to approach this problem; what would be a more elegant solution while still using an associative array? Thanks.

var myObject = [
    {id: 1, word: 'ant', definition: 'an insect with eight legs.'}, 
    {id: 2, word: 'cake', definition: 'a food made with flour and sugar.'},
    {id: 3, word: 'house', definition: 'a building where a family lives.'},
];

function search(arg){
    var count = 0;
    for (var i = 0; i <= myObject.length; i++) {
        if (myObject[i].word == arg) {
            document.write(myObject[i].id + " - " + myObject[i].word + " - " + 
                               myObject[i].definition + "<br>"); 
            count += 1;
        }
        else {
            if (count != 1 &&
                    myObject[i].word != arg &&
                    i == myObject.length - 1) {

                document.write("NOT FOUND!");
            }
        }
    }
}

var arg = prompt("Search For An Entry");
if (arg != null && arg.length != 0) {
    search(arg);
} 
share|improve this question
2  
From what I see, you're not using associative arrays but classical one. –  Michael Laffargue May 14 '12 at 14:11
    
Are the words unique? Is so, you could use an associative array instead of regular one. –  topp May 14 '12 at 14:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Looks pretty good. The only thing I could suggest (and it's a very small improvement) would be to cache the length of your associative array before looping over it, like this:

for (var i = 0, len = myObject.length; i < len; i++) {

You could also move that last if statement to check if the search parameter hasn't been found outside of the for loop, like this:

for (var i = 0, len = myObject.length; i < len; i++) {
    if (myObject[i].word == arg) {
        document.write(myObject[i].id + " - " + myObject[i].word + " - " + myObject[i].definition + "<br>");
        count += 1;
    }

    if(i == len-1 && count > 0) return;
}

document.write("NOT FOUND!");

This code exits the search function if it's found any of the search params before it ends the for loop. This means that any code exited outside the for loop only runs if the search results in "not found".

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Elliot. I like your approach which saves having to continue the loop until the end. –  Ryan C May 14 '12 at 14:52

Try this way:

var myObject = {'ant': {id: 1, word: 'ant', definition: 'an insect with eight legs.'}, 
        'cake' : {id: 2, word: 'cake', definition: 'a food made with flour and sugar.'},
        'house' : {id: 3, word: 'house', definition: 'a building where a family lives.'},
        };

function search(arg){
    var count = 0;
    if (myObject[arg] != undefined)
    {
        document.write(myObject[arg].id + " - " + arg + " - " + myObject[arg].definition + "<br>");
    }
    else
    {
        document.write("NOT FOUND!");
    }
}

This will only work if you have one definition per word. If you would like to have more, and still be able to summon the power of associative array, you might change the dictionary variable to something like this:

var myObject = {'ant': [{id: 1, word: 'ant', definition: 'an insect with eight legs.'}, {id: 666, word: 'ant', definition: 'progeny of the devil'}], 
        'cake' : [{id: 2, word: 'cake', definition: 'a food made with flour and sugar.'}],
        'house' : [{id: 3, word: 'house', definition: 'a building where a family lives.'}],
        };

and of course change the code accordingly

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your input, I'll experiment with this idea for sure. –  Ryan C May 14 '12 at 14:49

Here is my take at it:

var i, found = 0;

for (i = 0; i < myArray.length; i++) {
    if(myArray[i].word === arg) {
        document.write(myArray[i].id + " - " + myArray[i].word + " - " + myArray[i].definition + "<br>");
        found++;
    }
}

if(found === 0) {
    document.write("None found!");
}

Or instead of the final if, you could just always write the number of found items:

document.write(found.toString() + " items found");
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.