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While using safecopy to recover some data, I noticed that while rescuing some data, it could accidentally happen that either the system automounts the device or the user does so by accidentally clicking on f.e. the drive icon in nautilus.

I looked at the source for a bit and just for fun decided to hack on it a bit. I included liblockdev to possibly lock the drive while it is in use by safecopy, so that ideally could not be automounted. While this compiles, it does not have any effect so far. So the question, is it even possible to lock a device so that even root can't override it? (or at least not directly) Or am I trying to do something impossible? If it is possible, at least I know that only something else is wrong with my code, but that it should work in principle.

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Root should be able to override anything, but then automount as root is not very likely; the superuser would need to do this through the normal mount commands. For normal users, if using udisks, you could inhibit the automount daemon - see the --inhibit option: man.he.net/man1/udisks –  Piskvor May 14 '12 at 15:05
    
Is this question specific to a particular OS? If yes, please tag accordingly. –  undur_gongor May 14 '12 at 15:51
    
If you lock it so even root can't access it, what's the point of even having it connected? Sounds like what you really want is to force it to be read-only... –  Celada May 14 '12 at 16:06
    
Piskvor: I will investigate regarding udisk. I'm not if automount is directly as root, as member of an elevated group or using suid root or so, but it has the same effect. –  step21 May 14 '12 at 17:01
    
undur_gongor: noted, tagged –  step21 May 14 '12 at 17:02

1 Answer 1

You could make all systems attempt to mount a soft-link to the specified device so whenever you want to take it offline to work on you can simply remove the soft-link and replace it when you're done.

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