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I have known for awhile that the "View Dependencies" feature in SQL Server Management Studio is borderline useless as it hardly ever returns all dependencies, however, is there a better alternative? This is a pretty powerful feature for obvious reasons, but if you cannot rely on the results (as is the case with Microsoft), you have to do all the work by hand anyhow, just to be safe.

It seems like this would be pretty easy to implement, are there any tools out there that handle this effectively?

As a side note, does anyone know what is wrong with "View Dependencies"? Is there a specific class of dependencies that it has trouble identifying?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Red Gate has tool called SQL Dependency Tracker that works pretty well.

You can also write a query against the sys.sql_dependencies view which would give some basic info. Similar to this:

SELECT o.name, o.type_desc, p.name, p.type_desc
FROM sys.sql_dependencies d
INNER JOIN sys.objects o
    ON d.object_id = o.object_id
INNER JOIN sys.objects p
    ON d.referenced_major_id = p.object_id

Here is an article about finding dependencies:

Finding dependencies in SQL Server 2005

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While this would answer the question, it seems like a pretty steep investment to just meet the single need highlighted above (obviously there are other feature of this tool that perhaps makes it worth the price). Any other (cheaper) suggestions? –  Michael Kingsmill May 14 '12 at 15:07
2  
I updated my answer, with a query that you could use against the dependencies view –  bluefeet May 14 '12 at 15:08

You could try using SQL Search, which does a textual search of the object names and the textual definitions. The advantage is that it will also pick up dynamic SQL references, and the drawback is that it may pick up false positives as it's not searching based on a true dependency tree.

http://www.red-gate.com/products/sql-development/sql-search/

Another advantage is that it's currently free.

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1  
Well, to be explicit, it won't pick up all dynamic SQL references, particularly those where the dependent object(s) may be passed in as a parameter and defined as strings in the application(s) or in other procedures. –  Aaron Bertrand May 14 '12 at 16:08
    
True. There's no special magic whereby it parses the T-SQL to reconstruct the object references... that would be something. I guess this feature would require SQL Search working with a SQL profiler. Interesting idea. –  David Atkinson May 14 '12 at 16:34

Here's a three-step process. Still not perfect, but helps eliminate some of the gaps. Suppose you are looking for dependencies to the table "WidgetUser":

First, get a list of all modules that might have a reference to the table. Output the query results to text:

select 'EXEC sys.sp_refreshsqlmodule ''dbo.' + OBJECT_NAME(m.object_id) + ''''
from sys.sql_modules m
where m.definition like '%WidgetUser%'

Next, paste that output text and run the updates. This will be something like:

EXEC sys.sp_refreshsqlmodule 'dbo.up_WidgetUser_Select'
EXEC sys.sp_refreshsqlmodule 'dbo.up_WidgetUser_Update'
EXEC sys.sp_refreshsqlmodule 'dbo.WidgetUserView'
EXEC sys.sp_refreshsqlmodule 'dbo.ufx_WidgetUser_Fooinize'
...

Now that your dependencies are up-to-date, run sp_depends:

EXEC sp_depends @objname = N'dbo.WidgetUser'
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Late one but hopefully useful since recommended tool is free …

I’m using a similar tool to the one David recommended – ApexSQL Search. They claim to have their own dependency tracking mechanism that works for everything but dynamic SQL.

I haven’t tested it in detail to confirm this though…

Disclaimer: I’m not affiliated with this company but I do use their tools frequently.

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