Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been looking all around SO and MSDN for an answer to this question, but cannot seem to find a clear and final answer...

I know that it's in the C++11 standard and that current GCC version behave this way, but does VC2010 currently guarantees thread-safety of a local static variable initialization?

i.e.: Is this thread-safe with VC2010?

    static S& getInstance()
    {
        static S instance;
        return instance;
    }

...And if not, what is the current best practice to get a thread-safe singleton implementation in C++ with VC2010?

EDIT: As pointed out by Chris Betti's answer, VC2010 doesn't implement thread-safeness of local static variable init.

share|improve this question
    
See stackoverflow.com/questions/164496/… –  MerickOWA May 14 '12 at 15:25
    
@MerickOWA : This dates back to '08 and doesn't provide a clear and globally accepted answer. Plus it doesn't even cover VC2010 (due to topic age). –  Matt F. May 14 '12 at 15:32
    
@IC3M4N VS2010 was implemented before C++11 came out, If it doesn't implement thread safe construction of static local variables, then you're left with using techniques which have been around for many years. I don't see anything which doesn't apply to VS2010 –  MerickOWA May 14 '12 at 15:38
    
@IC3M4N to be clear, Chris's answer gives link to good general answers, I was just trying to provide a link to more windows specific answers to the question. –  MerickOWA May 14 '12 at 15:41
    
@MerickOWA I was just pointing out that it's not exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for your help though, it's appreciated. –  Matt F. May 14 '12 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 10 down vote accepted

From Visual Studio 2010's documentation on Static:

Assigning a value to a static local variable in a multithreaded application is not thread safe and we do not recommend it as a programming practice.

The second part of your question has some good existing answers.

share|improve this answer
    
Since c++11 , it is thread safe. –  Jagannath May 14 '12 at 15:21
5  
Agreed that c++11 requires it to be thread safe, but that does not mean VS2010 implements this requirement. According to their documentation, the requirement is not met. –  Chris Betti May 14 '12 at 15:23
    
@Jagannath As said in question, I know that. I was asking about VC2010 implementation of this particular C++11 feature. –  Matt F. May 14 '12 at 15:35
2  
This does not imply that construction of said is not safe. Only assignment. –  Puppy May 16 '12 at 1:05
1  
@DeadMG : Good point, but in all honesty it's safe to assume that if assignation is not thread-safe, initialization also isn't. –  Matt F. May 16 '12 at 18:03

The following code snippet shows "locally scoped static object initialisation" is NOT thread-safe:

#include <windows.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <process.h>
struct X {
    ~X() { puts("~X()"); }
    int i_ ;
    void print(void) {
        printf("thread id=%u, i = %d\n", GetCurrentThreadId(), i_);
    }
    X(int i) {
        puts("begin to sleep 10 seconds");
        Sleep(1000 * 10);
        i_ = i;
        printf("X(int) i = %d\n", i_);
        puts("end");
    }
};

X & getX()
{
    static X static_x(1000);
    return static_x;
}

void thread_proc(void *)
{
    X & x = getX();
    x.print();
}

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    HANDLE all_threads[2] = {};
    all_threads[0] = HANDLE( _beginthread(thread_proc, 0, 0) );
    printf("First thread Id: %u\n", GetThreadId(all_threads[0]) );
    Sleep(1000);
    all_threads[1] = HANDLE( _beginthread(thread_proc, 0, 0) );
    printf("Second thread Id: %u\n", GetThreadId(all_threads[1]) );
    WaitForMultipleObjects( _countof(all_threads), all_threads, TRUE, 1000 * 20);
    puts("main exit");
    return 0;
}

The output will be(of course thread id will be different on your machine):

First thread Id: 20104
begin to sleep 10 seconds
Second thread Id: 20248
thread id=20248, i = 0
X(int) i = 4247392
end
thread id=20104, i = 1000
main exit
~X()

Before the first thread returns which means the singleton's ctor is called and returned, the second thread get the un-initialized object and call it's member method(because the static object is in BSS segment, it'll be initilized to zero after loader load the executable) and get the wrong value: 0.

Turning on assembly listing by /FAsc /Fastatic.asm will get the assembly code for function getX():

01:  ?getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ PROC                 ; getX
02:  
03:  ; 20   : {
04:  
05:    00000    55       push    ebp
06:    00001    8b ec        mov     ebp, esp
07:  
08:  ; 21   :   static X static_x(1000);
09:  
10:    00003    a1 00 00 00 00   mov     eax, DWORD PTR ?$S1@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4IA
11:    00008    83 e0 01     and     eax, 1
12:    0000b    75 2b        jne     SHORT $LN1@getX
13:    0000d    8b 0d 00 00 00
14:     00       mov     ecx, DWORD PTR ?$S1@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4IA
15:    00013    83 c9 01     or  ecx, 1
16:    00016    89 0d 00 00 00
17:     00       mov     DWORD PTR ?$S1@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4IA, ecx
18:    0001c    68 e8 03 00 00   push    1000           ; 000003e8H
19:    00021    b9 00 00 00 00   mov     ecx, OFFSET ?static_x@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4U2@A
20:    00026    e8 00 00 00 00   call    ??0X@@QAE@H@Z      ; X::X
21:    0002b    68 00 00 00 00   push    OFFSET ??__Fstatic_x@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@YAXXZ ; `getX'::`2'::`dynamic atexit destructor for 'static_x''
22:    00030    e8 00 00 00 00   call    _atexit
23:    00035    83 c4 04     add     esp, 4
24:  $LN1@getX:
25:  
26:  ; 22   :   return static_x;
27:  
28:    00038    b8 00 00 00 00   mov     eax, OFFSET ?static_x@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4U2@A
29:  
30:  ; 23   : }

At line 10 the cryptic symbol [?$S1@?1??getX@@YAAAUX@@XZ@4IA] is the global indicator(also in BSS) which flags whether the singleton is ctored or not, it will be flaged as true by line 14-17, just before calling into the ctor, that's the problem, this also explains why the second thread immediately got the un-initialized singleton object and happily call it's member function. There's no thread-safety related code inserted by the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
Today I checked this with VS2013, (Unfortunately) the result is same. –  zhaorufei Apr 27 at 3:03

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.