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im creating a program that will compile java files, at the moment i have the program compiling numerous files at a time in one particular folder. but what i want it to do is to compile all the files in a folder structure given a folder to start (eg. if given the following address C:/files_to_be_compiled, can you search all the folders within this folder to get a list of all the .class files). I have this code that is getting all the .class files from a single folder but i need to expand this to get all the .class files from all the rest of the folders in that folder given

 String files;
        File folder = new File("C:/files_to_compile");
        File[] listOfFiles = folder.listFiles();
        {

            for (int i = 0; i < listOfFiles.length; i++) {

                if (listOfFiles[i].isFile()) {
                    files = listOfFiles[i].getName();
                    if (files.endsWith(".class") || files.endsWith(".CLASS")) {
                        System.out.println(files);
                    }
                }
            }
        }

how would i extend the code above get all the .class files from within all the folders in a given folder?

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exact duplicate of Read all files in a folder –  Alnitak May 14 '12 at 15:09
    
You should use recursion to traverse all directories within the current directory to scan for .class files.. also, use .toLowerCase() instead of comparing .class AND .CLASS –  styler1972 May 14 '12 at 15:21
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4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This answer may be of use to you.

Example code borrowed from linked answer:

public void listFilesForFolder(final File folder) {
    for (final File fileEntry : folder.listFiles()) {
        if (fileEntry.isDirectory()) {
            listFilesForFolder(fileEntry);
        } else {
            System.out.println(fileEntry.getName());
        }
    }
}

final File folder = new File("/home/you/Desktop");
listFilesForFolder(folder);
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2  
you should vote to close the question, not just plagiarise the other question's answer. –  Alnitak May 14 '12 at 15:10
    
@Alnitak: Plagiarizing consists of "stealing" text from another source without referencing the source. By that definition I am not plagiarizing the other answer. –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '12 at 15:11
    
ok, perhaps that was a little strong, but the point still stands - you identified an identical question, the standard procedure is to vote to close. –  Alnitak May 14 '12 at 15:16
    
@Alnitak: Good point, I'll vote to close. –  Elliot Bonneville May 14 '12 at 15:18
    
@Alnitak: what Elliot says is true and it answered my question as well so it should actually be marked up not down –  newSpringer May 14 '12 at 15:19
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Maybe somwthing like

void analyze(File folder){
    String files;        
    File[] listOfFiles = folder.listFiles();
    {

        for (int i = 0; i < listOfFiles.length; i++) {

            if (listOfFiles[i].isFile()) {
                files = listOfFiles[i].getName();
                if (files.endsWith(".class") || files.endsWith(".CLASS")) {
                    System.out.println(files);
                }
            } else if (listOfFiles[i].isDirectory()){
                analyze(listOfFiles[i]);
        }
    }
 }

void start(){
    File folder = new File("C:/files_to_compile");
    analyze(folder);
}

This way, you're analyzing your structure recursively (Depth-first search).

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3  
To prevent extensions like .Class or .cLaSs from slipping through, you might want to do a check like filename.toUppercase().endsWith(".CLASS") –  Mark Jeronimus May 14 '12 at 15:13
    
I know, but this is his code, I've just added the else if part :) Good point though! –  StepTNT May 14 '12 at 15:14
    
@Zom-B: It isn't a good point which you will recognize, if you put your ClAsS-files into a jar, and try to find them there, maybe on different plattforms. I've never seen a compiler not producing lowercase, and if there is, it should fail early, to be fixed. –  user unknown May 14 '12 at 15:24
    
filename.toUppercase() doesn't mean that the compiler will produce only uppercase files, it's just used to check the file extension without taking care of the string format. And a .ClAsS file is not valid in Java. (Assuming that I understood what you're saying!) –  StepTNT May 14 '12 at 15:30
    
@StepTNT: when you say You just need to use a method to call analyze(starting-folder-here), do you create a new file (File folder2 = new File("files_to_compile");) and put that into analyze(folder2)? –  newSpringer May 14 '12 at 15:36
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You can use DirectoryWalker from Apache Commons to walk through a directory hierarchy and apply a filter - FileFilterUtils.suffixFileFilter(".class"). For example:

public class ClassFileWalker extends DirectoryWalker {
    public ClassFileWalker() {
        super(FileFilterUtils.directoryFileFilter(), 
                FileFilterUtils.suffixFileFilter(".class"), -1);
    }

    protected void handleFile(File file, int depth, Collection results) {
        if(file.isFile())
            results.add(file);
    }

    public List<File> getFiles(String location) {
        List<File> files = Lists.newArrayList();
        try {
            walk(new File(location), files);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
        return files;
    }
}

Then use it like this:

ClassFileWalker walker = new ClassFileWalker();
List<File> files = walker.getFiles("C:/files_to_be_compiled");
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public static void listFilesForFolder(String path)
{
    File folder = new File(path);
    File[] files = folder.listFiles();
    for(File file : files)
    {
        if (file.isDirectory()){
            listFilesForFolder(file.getAbsolutePath());
        }
        else if (file.isFile())
        {
            // your code goes here
        }
    }
}

// run
listFilesForFolder("C:/files_to_compile");
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