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I'm using .NET framework (tried 3.5 & 4.0) to load a .TIFF file and save it as .PNG. I expect two subsequent calls to the Save() method (using the same TIFF file) to produce the same PNG file. The produced files are, however, 'sometimes' different.

The C# code below shows the problem:

Image sourceToConvert = Bitmap.FromFile("c:\\tmp\\F1.tif");
sourceToConvert.Save("c:\\tmp\\F1_gen.png", ImageFormat.Png);           

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    sourceToConvert = Bitmap.FromFile("c:\\tmp\\F1.tif");
    sourceToConvert.Save("c:\\tmp\\F1_regen.png", ImageFormat.Png);

    if (!CompareFileBytes("c:\\tmp\\F1_gen.png", "c:\\tmp\\F1_regen.png"))
        MessageBox.Show("Diff" + i);                
}

This will display 'Diff' at iteration 8, 32, 33, 73 114, 155, 196 on Windows 64, while it does not display any errors on 32 bit machines. (I use x86 target; with x64 target, it is worse: diff at iteration 12, 13, 14, 15, ...)

Is there a way to get a reproducible result from Save()?

A sample image can be found on this FTP site

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There are various settings that go into compressing a file and it may be optimizing for some factor at run time. For instance, something like dictionary size could affect the size of the compressed output but still yield the same decompressed data. So your images are still the same, but might have been optimized slightly differently. Probably building to 64bit is giving some different settings underneath the hood. You could look at the encoder settings for the Save overloads, but I didn't see anything off hand that would make the compressed output deterministic. –  mafafu May 14 '12 at 19:14
    
Thanks for your comment. I, too, supposed that the images should be the same in memory (only the .png files differ). But I went as far as writing a function to read back the images as BMP, convert to byte array and - they're different (although visualy the images do not differ). I also found that the problem only happens with relatively big images (approx. 2600x2600 pix in my case). I also tried with third-party libraries such as FreeImage - same problem: deterministic on 32bit, not on 64bit. –  werner May 15 '12 at 13:11
1  
can you post a link to that F1.tif image pls? –  avs099 May 15 '12 at 13:19
    
Thanks for looking into this - I put one here: ftp1.cstb.fr/ftp_sop/software/tmp/stackoverflow/F1.tif –  werner May 16 '12 at 7:41
1  
@werner Is this answered? I think it is. If so, please mark the answer as correct or make your own. If not, please, edit your question with new details to bring it to life. –  rcdmk Jun 11 '12 at 3:49

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I can't explain why this is happening, but it appears that non-deterministic finalization of the Image objects on the finalizer thread is affecting the encoding of images on the main thread. (Image implements IDisposable, so you should call Dispose on it to deterministically clean it up when you're finished using it; otherwise, it will be finalized at an arbitrary time in the future.)

If I change your example code to the following, I get the same results from every call to Save:

using (Image sourceToConvert = Bitmap.FromFile("c:\\tmp\\F1.tif"))
    sourceToConvert.Save("c:\\tmp\\F1_gen.png", ImageFormat.Png);           

for (int i = 0; i < 100; i++)
{
    using (Image sourceToConvert = Bitmap.FromFile("c:\\tmp\\F1.tif"))
        sourceToConvert.Save("c:\\tmp\\F1_regen.png", ImageFormat.Png);

    // files are the same
}

Note that I did find one further oddity: when running a 32-bit (x86) build on Windows 7 SP1 x64, the first two calls to Save returned different results, then every subsequent call to Save produced the same output as the second call. In order to make the test pass, I had to repeat the first two lines (before the loop) to force two saves before performing the equality checks.

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Thanks for that! Its a bit spooky that finalizing the image later should modify it, but your solution works perfectly for what I want to do. Excellent! –  werner Jun 14 '12 at 13:50

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