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My shell script is as following:

waiter()
{
    wait
    echo wait exit with $?
}


trap waiter SIGCHLD
rm -f fifo
mkfifo fifo
set -m

sleep 5&
read dummy < fifo

How ever , it interrupted by signal trap action.

bogon:xunlei ly$ waiter()
> {
>     wait
>     echo wait exit with $?
> }
bogon:xunlei ly$ 
bogon:xunlei ly$ 
bogon:xunlei ly$ trap waiter SIGCHLD
bogon:xunlei ly$ rm -f fifo
wait exit with 0
bogon:xunlei ly$ mkfifo fifo
wait exit with 0
bogon:xunlei ly$ set -m
bogon:xunlei ly$ 
bogon:xunlei ly$ sleep 5&
[1] 1089
bogon:xunlei ly$ read dummy < fifo
wait exit with 0
-bash: fifo: Interrupted system call

As I know , the system call:'read' can restart automatically from interrupt when read from a FIFO . I even write code to verify it :

set -x
cat <<-EOC  > $$.r.c
#include <fcntl.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(void)
{
    int fd = open("fifo", O_RDONLY);
    if (fd < 0 ){
        fprintf(stderr, "open");
        exit(1);
     }
    char buf [1024] = {0};
    int n = read(fd, buf, 1024);
    if(n < 0){
        fprintf(stderr, "read:%s",strerror(errno));
        exit(1);
     }
     write(1,buf,n);
     return 0;

}
EOC

cc -o  $$.r $$.r.c
rm -f $$.r.c

waiter()
{
    wait
    echo wait exit with $?
}


trap waiter SIGCHLD
rm -f fifo
mkfifo fifo
set -m

sleep 5&
read dummy < fifo

sleep 5&
./$$.r

trap '' SIGCHLD

The second c program's read system call handle and restart the signal interrupt. My env is :OS X 10.7, bash:3.2.48(1)-release. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
It's not a read that is interrupted, but the open. –  William Pursell May 14 '12 at 16:10
    
@WilliamPursell open return immediately, not blocked. –  lbaby May 15 '12 at 1:27
    
@WilliamPursell I look into it with dtruss, it's open interrupted. –  lbaby May 15 '12 at 3:12

1 Answer 1

Unix/Linux system calls do not automatically restart if interrupted. For example, if you look at the read(2) man page, you will see

It is not an error if [the number of bytes read] is smaller than the number of bytes requested; this may happen for example because fewer bytes are actually available right now (maybe because we were close to end-of-file, or because we are reading from a pipe, or from a terminal), or because read() was interrupted by a signal.

And if no bytes at all are read, you get -1 returned instead of 0, and errno set to EINTR.

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