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I am developing a backup utility and I am getting the error "Too many open files in system" after it runs for a while (error is returned by stat())

Since I am not actually opening any files (fopen()), my question is if any of the following functions (which I am using) take up a file descriptor, and if so, what can I do to release it?

getwd() chdir() mkdir() stat() time()

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Is your program using opendir() ? –  wildplasser May 14 '12 at 16:01
    
Nope, just the functions I listed along with system() to launch the cp command. –  Teh May 14 '12 at 19:35
    
What is "launch the cp command" ? If you invoke cp via system() or popen(), that will cost you a few file descriptors, too. –  wildplasser May 15 '12 at 8:28
    
But since I am copying the files sequentially, shouldn't that be a non issue? –  Teh May 15 '12 at 13:19
    
Apperently it is an issue. Please note that there is a system-wide limit on the number of open files. If your "utility" spawns a lot of child-processes this limit could be easily hit (and it can hit at any moment where a file descriptor needs to be allocated). But since you don't show us any actual code, we can only guess. –  wildplasser May 15 '12 at 13:25

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The functions you listed are safe; none of them return anything that you could "close".

To find out more, run the command lsof -p + PID of your backup process. That will give you a list of files which the process has opened which in turn will give you an idea what is going on.

lsof manual page

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Thank you, I will give this a try today and get back with the results –  Teh May 14 '12 at 15:58
    
+1 for the lsof -p! –  J. C. Leitão May 14 '12 at 16:08

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