Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to write a static class which could change a background of control, which will be passed to the parameter. So I achieved this:

public static void wrong(final Component component) {

        component.setBackground(Color.RED);
        Timer   timer = new Timer(2, wrongAction);

        wrongAction = new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                int green = component.getBackground().getGreen();
                int blue = component.getBackground().getBlue();
                component.setBackground(new Color(255, green + 1, blue + 1));
                if (component.getBackground() == Color.WHITE) {
                    timer.stop();
                }
            }
        };

        timer.start();

    }  

And I've got a error:

Cannot refer to a non-final variable timer inside an inner class defined in a different method

of course, we can change timer to final, but method stops working after we do that.
I tried to google it and to find answer in other stackoverflow topics, but nothing helped me.

Thanks a lot to everybody in advance!

share|improve this question
1  
For better help sooner, post an SSCCE. BTW - do you have a question? What is it? –  Andrew Thompson May 14 '12 at 16:26
2  
In what way does the method stop working after you make timer final? –  Don Roby May 14 '12 at 16:29
1  
Just change to "final Timer timer = " ?? It works fine for me. –  Adam May 14 '12 at 16:29
1  
Your '==' condition looks very suspicious, I would use 'equals()' instead. Making Timer t final should solve your problem. From what we see there, I don't see issues if you change that. –  Guillaume Polet May 14 '12 at 16:29
1  
"we can change timer to final, but method stops working after we do that" ...what happens exactly? What if you start() timer earlier? –  Kshitij May 14 '12 at 16:29

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem is that you use a different wrongAction reference.

public static void wrong(final Component component) {

    component.setBackground(Color.RED);
    Timer   timer = new Timer(2, wrongAction);// <-- Here wrongAction is not the one you
                                              // define on the next line

    wrongAction = new ActionListener() { // <-- This is a new ActionListener but Timer
                                         // has no knowledge about it.
        @Override
        public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

            int green = component.getBackground().getGreen();
            int blue = component.getBackground().getBlue();
            component.setBackground(new Color(255, green + 1, blue + 1));
            if (component.getBackground() == Color.WHITE) {
                timer.stop();
            }
        }
    };

    timer.start();

}

The following code will work immediately (but I don't find that very clean, would be better to encapsulate all this in an dedicated object, so that Timer can be a variable of the class and the listener could refer to it):

public static void wrong(final Component component) {
        class MyActionListener implements ActionListener {
            private Timer timer;

            public void setTimer(Timer timer) {
                this.timer = timer;
            }

            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                int green = component.getBackground().getGreen();
                int blue = component.getBackground().getBlue();
                component.setBackground(new Color(255, green + 1, blue + 1));
                if (component.getBackground().equals(Color.WHITE)) {
                    if (timer == null) {
                        System.err.println("This sucks, I got no timer");
                    } else {
                        timer.stop();
                    }
                }

            }
        }
        MyActionListener wrongAction = new MyActionListener();
        component.setBackground(Color.RED);
        Timer timer = new Timer(2, wrongAction);
        wrongAction.setTimer(timer);


        timer.start();

    }
share|improve this answer
    
that's what i really wanted! Thank you so much! –  mr.nothing May 14 '12 at 16:51
    
I wish this had been around when I was doing the same thing. Had to figure it out on my own after much bumbling around :D –  KChaloux May 14 '12 at 17:10
    
+1 for explanation and the approach :) –  Kshitij May 14 '12 at 17:13

wrongAction is an inner class and Java requires the local variables define outside needs to be final in order for it to be used in the inner class:

final Timer   timer = new Timer(2, wrongAction);

wrongAction = new ActionListener() {
    //...
}
share|improve this answer

you seem to passing wrongAction to timer constructor and then actually initializing it!!!

shouldn't the code

wrongAction = new ActionListener() {...
        };

be above

Timer   timer = new Timer(2, wrongAction);

???

Ofcourse, you need Timer timer =null; at the top

EDITED: How about you remove the wrongAction completely and keep it simple like this-

final Timer   timer = new Timer(2, new ActionListener() {
            @Override
            public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent e) {

                int green = component.getBackground().getGreen();
                int blue = component.getBackground().getBlue();
                component.setBackground(new Color(255, green + 1, blue + 1));
                if (component.getBackground() == Color.WHITE) {
                    timer.stop();
                }
            }
        });

;

share|improve this answer
    
This does not work, you still can't refer to timer from within the ActionListener –  Guillaume Polet May 14 '12 at 16:52
    
well just make it final in that case...the point i am trying to make is "wrongAction" need to be intialized earlier or completely removed –  Kshitij May 14 '12 at 16:56
    
That won't work either. Compiler will complain that timer may have not been initialized yet. –  Guillaume Polet May 14 '12 at 16:59
    
ohh!! just wondering how? final Timer timer = new Timer(2, new ActionListner(){...}); ....I think this code should initialized! shouldn't it? –  Kshitij May 14 '12 at 17:04
    
No, first you create ActionListener, which will require a reference to timer, since one of the method of ActionListener uses a reference to the final variable timer, then Timer is created. –  Guillaume Polet May 14 '12 at 17:10

you can pass a null in the constructor and then add an ActionListener

final Timer timer = new Timer(2,null);

timer.addActionListener(new ActionListener(){
//...
});
timer.start();
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.