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I backup my code directory tree nightly to my box storage with a python app that uses the box api version 1. To minimize network traffic, the app compares the present local hard disk metatada for each file, with the box metatdata for that file on only performs network transfers on files that have changed. I can get the metadata for all the files in the tree with one box api 1.0 request using the recurse option when requesting folder info. I understand that the 2.0 file/folder info requests are for a single file/folder and that the 2.0 api is in beta. Do you expect that in the future, the api will have some ability to get metadata on multiple files with one request? As it is now, the backup app, if I convert it to the 2.0 api, would do thousands of requests for file metadata, where the 1.0 api did one.

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2 Answers 2

If you're using v2, you'll probably be better suited to use the /events endpoint. The /event endpoint will tell you about all of the changes in your account since the last time you checked, which seems ideal for your particular use case since it will let you avoid checking files that haven't changed.

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Because old events get purged from the events stream (see Box.com events API - Old events dropped from stream? ), the only way to get information about older files and folders is to crawl, at which point the events endpoint is great for capturing deltas. For purposes of that initial crawl, though, it would be great if there was a way to request additional properties. Sounds like this is likely already under way in the form of a "filter" system: File size information for folder object.

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