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I have an idea for an iPhone app that will make billions of dollars for me, and help me take over the world. I am currently designing the architecture of the application. I had originally assumed that I would need to create and host a database that would allow users to upload their data and share it with other, targeted, users. But I thought it would be better if the users could send their data directly to each other without having it stored in a database. However, I haven't been able to find anything that would suggest this is possible.

Is it possible to send data between iPhones that are not in close proximity (bluetooth) and not on a LAN? For instance...User #1, who is in Tennessee, creates some information and hits "Send to others" and it sends that information directly to User #2, who is in Arizona, and User #3, who is in Maine. Could the text messaging functionality be hacked to do that?

(I realize that the phones belonging to Users #2 and #3 would have to be on, and running the app that would receive the data)

I am new to mobile development, and I am still getting used to the functionality of mobile devices so, I am certain this is a dumb question. But, it is worth asking because, if it can be done, this would dramatically change the architecture (and maintenance costs) of this application.

Thanks, in advance, for whatever advice/pointers you can give.

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4  
this sounds a lot like e-mail.... – Jason McTaggart May 14 '12 at 16:46
    
Thanks for your reply. Can an app that is running on an iphone capture incoming email messages and get the data out of them? – rogdawg May 14 '12 at 16:53
    
+1 just for the line about taking over the world. – davidethell May 14 '12 at 17:30
up vote 1 down vote accepted

This is something handled by using the publish - subscribe pattern. You may want to look into a plug 'n play service such as pubnub. That will let you do just that. Phones that should be receiving each other's messages will have listeners set up on the same pubnub channel, and will receive a notification when any of the other phones publish to that channel. Something like pubnub has a pretty simple API/SDK that you can use to get a prototype up and running pretty quickly (and for free, at least at first).

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thanks very much for pointing me in a good direction. The research begins... – rogdawg May 14 '12 at 18:29

User #1's app sends the message to your server. You server does an APNS push to the phones of users #2, and #3. They don't even need to be running the app.

No need to mark this correct or up-vote it, but I will take a high-paying job in the new world order.

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Thank you for your response. I wish I could mark two posts as "answers" because, I think, in this case, that is true. Rest assured I will keep you (and lolcat) in mind when it comes time to appoint overlords to rule the various regions of my empire. – rogdawg May 14 '12 at 18:28

Amazon has an application service called Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS) which Allows you to create queue's with messages in them tat app's can subscribe to.

To quote their page:

Amazon Simple Queue Service (Amazon SQS) offers a reliable, highly scalable, hosted queue for storing messages as they travel between computers. By using Amazon SQS, developers can simply move data between distributed components of their applications that perform different tasks, without losing messages or requiring each component to be always available. Amazon SQS makes it easy to build an automated workflow, working in close conjunction with the Amazon Elastic Compute Cloud (Amazon EC2) and the other AWS infrastructure web services.

Amazon SQS works by exposing Amazon’s web-scale messaging infrastructure as a web service. Any computer on the Internet can add or read messages without any installed software or special firewall configurations. Components of applications using Amazon SQS can run independently, and do not need to be on the same network, developed with the same technologies, or running at the same time.

They have an iOS API to integrate it into your app, and it is free for up to 100,000 messages per month and then $0.01 per 10,000 messages after that.

More info here: http://aws.amazon.com/sqs/

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Is it possible to send data between iPhones that are not in close proximity (bluetooth) and not on a LAN?

The two devices obviously need some kind of connectivity.

For instance...User #1, who is in Tennessee, creates some information and hits "Send to others" and it sends that information directly to User #2, who is in Arizona, and User #3, who is in Maine. Could the text messaging functionality be hacked to do that?

The problems here are:

  • helping each device discover the correct address for the others, and...

  • ensuring that the devices can reach each other.

Mobile devices are constantly moving around on the network and changing their IP addresses as they go. As you're driving to work, your device may have Internet access through it's 3G connection, except for those times when you're driving through a tunnel and don't have any connectivity at all. Once you enter your building, a wifi connection becomes available, so the device switches to that. But your company's network has a firewall that blocks incoming connections, and it's impossible to know in advance which IP address you'll get from the DHCP server at any given time anyway. The same is true for the folks in Arizona and Maine and wherever else.

A server, on the other hand, is usually located at an address that's both easy to discover (thanks to the Domain Name System), easy to reach, and almost always available. For those reasons, it's common to have mobile devices communicate with each other by going through an intermediate server.

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