Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a large XML file (about 10K rows) I need to parse regularly that is in this format:

<summarysection>
    <totalcount>10000</totalcount>
</summarysection>
<items>
     <item>
         <cat>Category</cat>
         <name>Name 1</name>
         <value>Val 1</value>
     </item>
     ...... 10,000 more times
</items>

What I'd like to do is parse each of the individual nodes using nokogiri to count the amount of items in one category. Then, I'd like to subtract that number from the total_count to get an ouput that reads "Count of Interest_Category: n, Count of All Else: z".

This is my code now:

#!/usr/bin/ruby

require 'rubygems'
require 'nokogiri'
require 'open-uri'

icount = 0 
xmlfeed = Nokogiri::XML(open("/path/to/file/all.xml"))
all_items = xmlfeed.xpath("//items")

  all_items.each do |adv|
            if (adv.children.filter("cat").first.child.inner_text.include? "partofcatname")
                icount = icount + 1
            end
  end

othercount = xmlfeed.xpath("//totalcount").inner_text.to_i - icount 

puts icount
puts othercount

This seems to work, but is very slow! I'm talking more than 10 minutes for 10,000 items. Is there a better way to do this? Am I doing something in a less than optimal fashion?

share|improve this question
1  
    
@ismaelga I know that nokogiri is generally pretty quick with these things. I was more wondering if my syntax was making the best use of the gem or whether my code could be optimized in any way. –  DNadel May 14 '12 at 17:52
    
First answer of that question I linked says about using other ways instead of xpath and that should improve your performance v –  Ismael Abreu May 14 '12 at 18:09
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can dramatically decrease your time to execute by changing your code to the following. Just change the "99" to whatever category you want to check.:

require 'rubygems'
require 'nokogiri'
require 'open-uri'

icount = 0 
xmlfeed = Nokogiri::XML(open("test.xml"))
items = xmlfeed.xpath("//item")
items.each do |item|
  text = item.children.children.first.text  
  if ( text =~ /99/ )
    icount += 1
  end
end

othercount = xmlfeed.xpath("//totalcount").inner_text.to_i - icount 

puts icount
puts othercount

This took about three seconds on my machine. I think a key error you made was that you chose the "items" iterate over instead of creating a collection of the "item" nodes. That made your iteration code awkward and slow.

share|improve this answer
1  
I'm not going to claim that my way is better than using the SAX parser, but it does what you said you wanted: cuts the time to execute down to something manageable. –  vlasits May 14 '12 at 19:27
    
Thanks! The changes you suggested worked. I was actually iterating over item vs. items (error in code modification for posting) but the matching you use(the =~ ) is ridiculously faster. Why would this be so much faster than "includes?". Either way, it works now in under 5 minutes. Thanks again! –  DNadel May 14 '12 at 19:37
1  
Just curious. How long does it take now? You said "under 5 minutes", but my results came back in a mere 3 seconds. –  vlasits May 14 '12 at 19:43
    
Also, the speed increase isn't do to the difference between include? and =~ They benchmark reasonable similar. I'm guessing that this "adv.children.filter("cat").first.child.inner_text" is the non-performant part. –  vlasits May 14 '12 at 19:52
    
Just ran it with 'time' and it clocked in at 50 seconds. This may be due to the actual data I'm parsing - there are a lot more fields in the XML - the file is > 15 MB and I'm running it on a small linux box under my desk :) Just curious... the reason I did not use the .first part is that I can't guarantee the field to parse will be first in the XML markup itself. Do you think there's a way to specifically target it by node name and keep the performance up? Either way, this is really great. Thanks again for the help! –  DNadel May 14 '12 at 23:00
show 2 more comments

Here's an example comparing a SAX parser count with a DOM-based count, counting 500,000 <item>s with one of seven categories. First, the output:

Create XML file: 1.7s
Count via SAX: 12.9s
Create DOM: 1.6s
Count via DOM: 2.5s

Both techniques produce the same hash counting the number of each category seen:

{"Cats"=>71423, "Llamas"=>71290, "Pigs"=>71730, "Sheep"=>71491, "Dogs"=>71331, "Cows"=>71536, "Hogs"=>71199}

The SAX version takes 12.9s to count and categorize, while the DOM version takes only 1.6s to create the DOM elements and 2.5s more to find and categorize all the <cat> values. The DOM version is around 3x as fast!

…but that's not the entire story. We have to look at RAM usage as well.

  • For 500,000 items SAX (12.9s) peaks at 238MB of RAM; DOM (4.1s) peaks at 1.0GB.
  • For 1,000,000 items SAX (25.5s) peaks at 243MB of RAM; DOM (8.1s) peaks at 2.0GB.
  • For 2,000,000 items SAX (55.1s) peaks at 250MB of RAM; DOM (???) peaks at 3.2GB.

I had enough memory on my machine to handle 1,000,000 items, but at 2,000,000 I ran out of RAM and had to start using virtual memory. Even with an SSD and a fast machine I let the DOM code run for almost ten minutes before finally killing it.

It is very likely that the long times you are reporting are because you are running out of RAM and hitting the disk continuously as part of virtual memory. If you can fit the DOM into memory, use it, as it is FAST. If you can't, however, you really have to use the SAX version.

Here's the test code:

require 'nokogiri'

CATEGORIES = %w[ Cats Dogs Hogs Cows Sheep Pigs Llamas ]
ITEM_COUNT = 500_000

def test!
  create_xml
  sleep 2; GC.start # Time to read memory before cleaning the slate
  test_sax
  sleep 2; GC.start # Time to read memory before cleaning the slate
  test_dom
end

def time(label)
  t1 = Time.now
  yield.tap{ puts "%s: %.1fs" % [ label, Time.now-t1 ] }
end

def test_sax
  item_counts = time("Count via SAX") do
    counter = CategoryCounter.new
    # Use parse_file so we can stream data from disk instead of flooding RAM
    Nokogiri::HTML::SAX::Parser.new(counter).parse_file('tmp.xml')
    counter.category_counts
  end
  # p item_counts
end

def test_dom
  doc = time("Create DOM"){ File.open('tmp.xml','r'){ |f| Nokogiri.XML(f) } }
  counts = time("Count via DOM") do
    counts = Hash.new(0)
    doc.xpath('//cat').each do |cat|
      counts[cat.children[0].content] += 1
    end
    counts
  end
  # p counts
end

class CategoryCounter < Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Document
  attr_reader :category_counts
  def initialize
    @category_counts = Hash.new(0)
  end
  def start_element(name,att=nil)
    @count = name=='cat'
  end
  def characters(str)
    if @count
      @category_counts[str] += 1
      @count = false
    end
  end
end

def create_xml
  time("Create XML file") do
    File.open('tmp.xml','w') do |f|
      f << "<root>
      <summarysection><totalcount>10000</totalcount></summarysection>
      <items>
      #{
        ITEM_COUNT.times.map{ |i|
          "<item>
            <cat>#{CATEGORIES.sample}</cat>
            <name>Name #{i}</name>
            <name>Value #{i}</name>
          </item>"
        }.join("\n")
      }
      </items>
      </root>"
    end
  end
end

test! if __FILE__ == $0

How does the DOM Counting Work?

If we strip away some of the test structure, the DOM-based counter looks like this:

# Open the file on disk and pass it to Nokogiri so that it can stream read;
# Better than  doc = Nokogiri.XML(IO.read('tmp.xml'))
# which requires us to load a huge string into memory just to parse it
doc = File.open('tmp.xml','r'){ |f| Nokogiri.XML(f) }

# Create a hash with default '0' values for any 'missing' keys
counts = Hash.new(0) 

# Find every `<cat>` element in the document (assumes one per <item>)
doc.xpath('//cat').each do |cat|
  # Get the child text node's content and use it as the key to the hash
  counts[cat.children[0].content] += 1
end

How does the SAX counting Work?

First, let's focus on this code:

class CategoryCounter < Nokogiri::XML::SAX::Document
  attr_reader :category_counts
  def initialize
    @category_counts = Hash.new(0)
  end
  def start_element(name,att=nil)
    @count = name=='cat'
  end
  def characters(str)
    if @count
      @category_counts[str] += 1
      @count = false
    end
  end
end

When we create a new instance of this class we get an object that has a Hash that defaults to 0 for all values, and a couple of methods that can be called on it. The SAX Parser will call these methods as it runs through the document.

  • Each time the SAX parser sees a new element it will call the start_element method on this class. When that happens, we set a flag based on whether this element is named "cat" or not (so that we can find the name of it later).

  • Each time the SAX parser slurps up a chunk of text it calls the characters method of our object. When that happens, we check to see if the last element we saw was a category (i.e. if @count was set to true); if so, we use the value of this text node as the category name and add one to our counter.

To use our custom object with Nokogiri's SAX parser we do this:

# Create a new instance, with its empty hash
counter = CategoryCounter.new

# Create a new parser that will call methods on our object, and then
# use `parse_file` so that it streams data from disk instead of flooding RAM
Nokogiri::HTML::SAX::Parser.new(counter).parse_file('tmp.xml')

# Once that's done, we can get the hash of category counts back from our object
counts = counter.category_counts
p counts["Pigs"]
share|improve this answer
2  
You're awesome. –  vlasits May 15 '12 at 12:18
2  
This is super cool. I need about 3 more cups of coffee to totally understand it, though :) –  DNadel May 15 '12 at 16:31
    
@DNadel So that you need less caffeine in your life I've edited the bottom of my answer with explanations for how the core of DOM-based and SAX-based counting works. –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 16:42
add comment

I'd recommend using a SAX parser rather than a DOM parser for a file this large. Nokogiri has a nice SAX parser built in: http://nokogiri.org/Nokogiri/XML/SAX.html

The SAX way of doing things is nice for large files simply because it doesn't build a giant DOM tree, which in your case is overkill; you can build up your own structures when events fire (for counting nodes, for example).

share|improve this answer
    
FWIW, see my answer for the comparison; though the memory savings of SAX are nice (critical sometimes), the performance is worse even for something so trivial as this. –  Phrogz May 15 '12 at 5:08
add comment

Check out Greg Weber's version of Paul Dix's sax-machine gem: http://blog.gregweber.info/posts/2011-06-03-high-performance-rb-part1

Parsing large file with SaxMachine seems to be loading the whole file into memory

sax-machine makes the code much much simpler; Greg's variant makes it stream.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.