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I need a data structure that stores integers in such a way that each number is connected to the two (or more) adjacent ones immediately below itself, like

      1
     / \
    3   2
   / \ / \
  5   6   4
 / \ / \ / \
7   9   8  10

And then need to find the maximum sum of any descending paths from the root to the bottom base row, for example, in the data shown above, 1-3-6-9 will be the path which has the max sum of 19.

It's possible that one node can connect to more than 2 child nodes.

I've tried to implement a C# tree class, but can't quite work out how to add the children correctly, so just wonder if it is really needed to have a tree structore and create a algorithm to find the max sum efficiently. Here's that code: http://ideone.com/GeH36c

In terms of language, C# and C++ are both ok.

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6  
What have you tried? Is it homework? –  David Brabant May 14 '12 at 17:36
2  
Similar: stackoverflow.com/questions/9154242/… –  jrok May 14 '12 at 17:38
    
I've tried to implement a C# tree class, but can't quite work out how to add the children correctly, so just wonder if it is really needed to have a tree structore. –  esun203 May 14 '12 at 17:53
4  
Perhaps because that structure is not a tree? A node in a tree has at most one parent node. –  Robᵩ May 14 '12 at 17:56
    
Also, is your question about C# or C++? –  Robᵩ May 14 '12 at 17:59

5 Answers 5

The class that comes into my mind (C#) for data structure:

class Node
{
    int value;
    Node parent;            // You might do without this element
                            // Or use List<Node> parents for multiple parents;
    List<Node> childs;
}

As for an algorithm, what I can think of is start from top, and with a recursive function make your way to the bottom (depth first), comparing all the sums, retaining the Node values for maximum sum.

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I don't have access to a compiler right now, so the code below might have some errors. I think it illustrates the general principle though (using recursion.) I'll try running it as soon as I'm able and fix any errors.

#include <vector>
using namespace std;

class Node {
public:
    Node() {}
    Node(int val) { 
        this->value = val; 
        this->maxSumAtThisNode = 0; 
        this->children.push_back(NULL);
    }
    void addChild(Node* child) { this->children.push_back(child); }
    int numChildren() { return this->children.size(); }
    int getMaxSum() { return this->maxSumAtThisNode; }
    void setMaxSum(int new_sum) { this->maxSumAtThisNode = new_sum; }
    int getValue() { return this->value; }
    Node* getChildAtIndex(int i) {return this->children[i]; }
private:
    int value;
    int maxSumAtThisNode;
    vector<Node*> children;
};

class Tree {
public:
    Tree(Node* rootNode) { this->root = rootNode; };
    int findMaxSum(Node* currentNode) {
        bool isLeafNode = true;
        Node* child = new Node;
        for (int i=0;i<(currentNode->numChildren());i++) {
            child = currentNode->getChildAtIndex(i);
            if (child) {
                isLeafNode = false;
                int theSum = currentNode->getMaxSum() + child->getValue();
                if (child->getMaxSum() < theSum) {
                    child->setMaxSum(theSum);
                }
                this->findMaxSum(child);
            }
        }
        if (isLeafNode) {this->leafNodes.push_back(currentNode); }
        int maxSum = 0;
        for (int j=0;j<leafNodes.size();j++) {
            if (leafNodes[j]->getMaxSum() > maxSum) { maxSum = leafNodes[j]->getMaxSum(); }
        }
        return maxSum;
    }
private:
    vector<Node*> leafNodes;
    Node* root;
};
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Rather than actually storing it in a tree based structure, if the tree is always balanced (such as in your example) it might be better to just use a jagged array:

int[][] pyramid = new int[]
{
  new[]{1}
  new[]{2, 3}
  new[]{5, 6, 4}
  new[]{7, 9, 8, 10}
}

The children of the item at pyramid[i][j] are pyramid[i+1][j] and pyramid[i+1][j+1]

When it comes to actually finding the max path, you can use a backtracker. There may be ways of trimming off paths, but if you use a backtracker you should know that it has an exponential runtime complexity (which means it doesn't scale well). While you can make some backtrackers that are better than others, I'm not sure if you will be able to find an algorithm that's better than O(2^n) in the general case.

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I think you missed : It's possible that one node can connect to more than 2 child nodes –  Henk Holterman May 14 '12 at 17:52

If you are talking about Binary Tree or AVL tree its this:

typedef struct Node{

    int value;
    Node *right;
    Node *left;
    BOOL hit;

}TypeNode;

Btw, since you are looking for the highest sum you can do it like this:

typedef struct node{
    int value;
    node* right;
    node* left;
    BOOL hit;
}TypeNode;

BOOL haveBrother(TypeNode *node){
  if(node->right!=NULL || node->left!=NULL){
      return true;
  }
  return false;
}

int getSum(TypeNode *root, char* str){
  int sum=0;
  strcpy(str,"");
  TypeNode *aux=root;
  while(aux!=NULL){
      if(aux->left!=NULL){
          if(!aux->left->hit){
              if(haveBrother(aux->left)){
                  aux=aux->left;
                  sum+=aux->value;
                  strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                  strcat(str,"-");
              }else{
                  sum+=aux->left->value;
                  aux->left->hit=true;
                  strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                  strcat(str,"-");
                  break;
              }
          }else{
              aux->left->hit=false;
              if(aux->right!=NULL){
                  if(!aux->right->hit){
                      if(haveBrother(aux->right)){
                          aux=aux->right;
                          sum+=aux->value;
                          strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                            strcat(str,"-");
                      }else{
                          sum+=aux->right->value;
                          aux->right->hit=true;
                          strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                            strcat(str,"-");
                          break;
                      }
                  }else{
                      aux->right->hit=false;
                      aux->hit=true;
                      sum+=aux->value;
                      strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                        strcat(str,"-");
                      break;
                  }
              }else{
                  aux->hit=true;
                  sum+=aux->value;
                  strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
                  strcat(str,"-");
                  break;
              }
          }
      }else{
          aux->hit=true;
          sum+=aux->value;
          strcat(str,itoa(aux->value));
            strcat(str,"-");
          break;
      }
  }
  return sum;
}

int main{
    TypeNode *root=new TypeNode;
    int sum=0;
    int highestsum=0;
    char sumpath[100];
    do{
        sum=getSum(root,sumpath);
        if(sum>highestsum){
            highestsum=sum;
        }
    }while(sum!=0);
    printf("path: %s, with total sum: %d",sumpath,highestsum);
}

just made it, not sure if its working, test there, report if it isn't working

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No, it's not a binary tree. –  Henk Holterman May 14 '12 at 18:23
    
but the code doesn't help at all? –  Guilherme Garcia May 14 '12 at 20:19

(If you want to learn, read the comments from the code ;) )

You could also try using linked lists in C++. You can create a struct like this:

struct MyNumber{
    //The number itself
    int me;
    //Each number has 2 derived numbers
    MyNumber *childA,*childB;
    //A default constructor of a number that doesn't have 'sons'
    MyNumber(int me):me(me),childA(NULL),childB(NULL)
    {}
};

Then you create a "MyNumber" that will be the top of the pyramid, and a list of "MyNumber" that will represent the bottom of the pyramid:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

//The top of the pyramid only has 1 number. It's null because it hasn't been initiated.
MyNumber *top=NULL;
//The bottom is composed of a list of numbers
vector<MyNumber*> bottom;

After that you create a function wich adds new levels to the pyramid:

void add_level(int count,int * list_of_numbers){
    //if the top of the pyramid doesn't exist (is null) then initiate one
    if(top==NULL)
    {
        //You can only add 1 number to the top. If not, there must be an error.
        if(count!=1){
            cout<<"Error: can't add more than one number at the top of the pyramid"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        //You made it correctly! We will create the top with the first number of the list.
        top=new Number(list_of_numbers[0]);
    }
    //The top is already created. We will connect numbers.
    else{
        //The new level to be added:
        vector<MyNumber*> new_level;
        //The count of the new numbers list must be 1 more than the bottom size,
        //unless that the bottom size is 0: the count will be 2
        if(bottom.size()==0)
             if(count!=2){
                 cout<<"Error: the second level can only have 2 numbers"<<endl;
                 return;
             }
        else if( bottom.size()!=(count-1) ){
            cout<<"Error: the new level can only have "<<bottom.size()+1<<" numbers"<<endl;
            return;
        }
        //adding the numbers to the new level list
        bool bfirst_time=true;
        for(int i=0,e=0;i<count;i++)
        {
            MyNumber * new_number=new MyNumber(list_of_numbers[i]);
            new_level.push_back(new_number);
            if(bfirst_time)
            {
                //Setting the childA from the old bottom as the first number from the list
                //Do this only 1 time
                bottom[0]->childA=new_number;
                bfirst_time=false;
            }
            else{
                //The 'e' bottom number will be new number parent as well as the 'e+1'
                //bottom number (every number has 2 parents except the first and last
                //number from the new list)
                bottom[e]->childB=new_number;
                e++;
                if(e<bottom.size())
                    bottom[e]->childA=new_number;
            }
        }
        //connecting those numbers with their parent/s(the old bottom of the pyramid)
    }
}

Next you add the numbers to the pyramid using the function:

int * list_of_numbers=new int[1];
list_of_numbers[0]=1;
//adding the top
add_level(1,list_of_numbers);
list_of_numbers=new int[2];
list_of_numbers[0]=2;
list_of_numbers[0]=3;
//adding the second level
add_level(2,list_of_numbers);
...

Finally you can get the maximum sum by this way:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>

using namespace std;

//the int containing the sum
int max_sum=top->me;
//a clone of the top
MyNumber * clone=top;
//same as "while you don't reach the bottom of the pyramid, continue"
while(clone->childA!=NULL && clone->childB!=NULL)
{
    //add the biggest value to the max_sum variable
    max_sum+=max(clone->childA->me,clone->childB->me);
    //setting the clone as the biggest child
    clone=(clone->childA->me > clone->childB->me)? clone->childA:clone->childB;
}

You can improve this code a lot. Probably it is easier to make it in C# but I don't use it :(

There may be some errors in the code, I didn't test it :P

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Your algorithm will not work. What if at one level for a node you have child A with value 1 and child B with value 2. I will choose child B. Now assume that child A is followed by 10 and 12, and child B is followed by 4 and 3. The rest of the tree is 1. How would that get your maximum sum? –  George May 14 '12 at 20:51

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