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After reading, this question. I figured I need to look over my structure to avoid redundant code.

My current structure is Controller -> Repository -> IRepository.

The repository looks like this:

public class UserRepository : IUserRepository, IDisposable
{
    private StudentSchedulingEntities _context;

    public UserRepository(StudentSchedulingEntities context)
    {
        if (context == null)
            throw new ArgumentNullException("context");

        _context = context;
    }
    public IEnumerable<User> GetUsers()
    {
        return _context.Users.ToList();
    }
    public User GetUserByID(int id)
    {
        return _context.Users.Find(id);

    }
    public void InsertStudent(User user)
    {
        _context.Users.Add(user);
    }
    public void DeleteStudent(int userID)
    {
        User usr = _context.Users.Find(userID);
        _context.Users.Remove(usr);
    }
    public void UpdateStudent(User user)
    {
        _context.Entry(user).State = EntityState.Modified;
    }
    public void Save() {
        _context.SaveChanges();
    }
    public void Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true); 
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this); 
    }
    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposing)
        {
            if (_context != null)
            {
                _context.Dispose();
                _context = null;
            }
        }
    }
}

My IRepository looks like this:

public interface IUserRepository : IDisposable
{
    IEnumerable<User> GetUsers();
    User GetUserByID(int userID);
    void InsertStudent(User user);
    void DeleteStudent(int userID);
    void UpdateStudent(User user);
    void Save();
}

I want to avoid doing this again in the service layer. Do I need the Repository Class or should I just implement the Service Layer in replacement of the Repository?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your service layer won't need any repository implementations, it will simply use a repository to lookup a user, add/edit/delete a user, etc.

Now, if I can offer a bit of opinion, I'd recommend going with a generic repository. That way, if you need to make new repositories it is really simple. We use nopCommerce, and they use the following code:

public partial interface IRepository<T> where T : BaseEntity
{
    T GetById(object id);
    void Insert(T entity);
    void Update(T entity);
    void Delete(T entity);
    IQueryable<T> Table { get; }
}

And since it use Entity Framework, this is the implementation:

/// <summary>
/// Entity Framework repository
/// </summary>
public partial class EfRepository<T> : IRepository<T> where T : BaseEntity
{
    private readonly IDbContext _context;
    private IDbSet<T> _entities;

    /// <summary>
    /// Ctor
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="context">Object context</param>
    public EfRepository(IDbContext context)
    {
        this._context = context;
    }

    public T GetById(object id)
    {
        return this.Entities.Find(id);
    }

    public void Insert(T entity)
    {
        try
        {
            if (entity == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("entity");

            this.Entities.Add(entity);

            this._context.SaveChanges();
        }
        catch (DbEntityValidationException dbEx)
        {
            var msg = string.Empty;

            foreach (var validationErrors in dbEx.EntityValidationErrors)
                foreach (var validationError in validationErrors.ValidationErrors)
                    msg += string.Format("Property: {0} Error: {1}", validationError.PropertyName, validationError.ErrorMessage) + Environment.NewLine;

            var fail = new Exception(msg, dbEx);
            //Debug.WriteLine(fail.Message, fail);
            throw fail;
        }
    }

    public void Update(T entity)
    {
        try
        {
            if (entity == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("entity");

            this._context.SaveChanges();
        }
        catch (DbEntityValidationException dbEx)
        {
            var msg = string.Empty;

            foreach (var validationErrors in dbEx.EntityValidationErrors)
                foreach (var validationError in validationErrors.ValidationErrors)
                    msg += Environment.NewLine + string.Format("Property: {0} Error: {1}", validationError.PropertyName, validationError.ErrorMessage);

            var fail = new Exception(msg, dbEx);
            //Debug.WriteLine(fail.Message, fail);
            throw fail;
        }
    }

    public void Delete(T entity)
    {
        try
        {
            if (entity == null)
                throw new ArgumentNullException("entity");

            this.Entities.Remove(entity);

            this._context.SaveChanges();
        }
        catch (DbEntityValidationException dbEx)
        {
            var msg = string.Empty;

            foreach (var validationErrors in dbEx.EntityValidationErrors)
                foreach (var validationError in validationErrors.ValidationErrors)
                    msg += Environment.NewLine + string.Format("Property: {0} Error: {1}", validationError.PropertyName, validationError.ErrorMessage);

            var fail = new Exception(msg, dbEx);
            //Debug.WriteLine(fail.Message, fail);
            throw fail;
        }
    }

    public virtual IQueryable<T> Table
    {
        get
        {
            return this.Entities;
        }
    }

    private IDbSet<T> Entities
    {
        get
        {
            if (_entities == null)
                _entities = _context.Set<T>();
            return _entities;
        }
    }
        //TODO implement IDisposable interface
}

Now it would be as simple as IRepository<User> or IRepository<Whatever>.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response. I have a Generic Repository, but I felt I needed a regular custom repository for tables that have child tables. (not quite sure how to implement that). So I figured, I should implement the service layer to handle that. Do you happen to know of a reference to a tutorial/article that might lead me in the right direction? – xivo May 14 '12 at 18:05
    
I agree, your service layer should handle that. Really, the repository is pretty dumb - it should just get and set data. Your service layer is where you are going to put in your checks and balances before doing anything with the data (e.g., making sure the data exists in the parent table before putting data into the child table). As for a tutorial, unfortunately I do not have a link. I'll see what I can dig up though. Good luck! – Tim Hobbs May 14 '12 at 18:41
    
It is a little thin, but it is pretty starightforward, so hopefully it has some value for you: link – Tim Hobbs May 14 '12 at 18:43

Definitely no to redundant code :-) When you say:

My current structure is Controller -> Repository ->

Is Controller inheriting from Repository? You don't want that either. The repository layer typically interfaces to storage (XML, database, file system, etc) and maps to repository friendly classes. Another layer manages the mapping of the repository layer to your native business/service classes.

share|improve this answer

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