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I am following the interactive tutorials on rubymonk.com and have just started with lambda's which I feel I grasp reasonably well, however I am a bit lost with this code:

1  def with_names(fn)
2   result = []
3   [ ["Christopher", "Alexander"],
4     ["John", "McCarthy"],
5     ["Joshua", "Norton"] ].each do |pair|
6       result << fn.call(pair[0], pair[1])
7   end
8   result
9  end
10  l = lambda { |first_name, last_name| "#{first_name} #{last_name}" }
11  with_names(l)

Are the names entered between line 3's first [ and line 5's ] held in an array or a hash? My understanding is that they are a hash of arrays and that when calling `.each do |pair| we are iterating through each array in the hash, is this correct? In the next piece of code on line 6:

result << fn.call(pair[0], pair[1])

I believe that we are pushing each array element into the results array, although I'm not sure exactly how this code works especially the fn.call part as I believe the (pair[0], pair[1]) part is simply pulling the data in the index location of each array passed through the block. A clear explanation of what is going on here would be much appreciated, I feel I am almost there with it. Thanks.

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1  
it's surprising to see this code in a book, IMHO it's unidiomatic Ruby. I understand the use a weird lambda instead of a block to show the difference later, but that each should be a map and pair should be unpacked in the block arguments. – tokland May 14 '12 at 19:28
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Are the names entered between line 3's first [ and line 5's ] held in an array or a hash?

The name strings are held in arrays, all of which are contained in another "master" array. On looping through the "master" array, its elements (namely, ["Christopher", "Alexander"], etc.) will be passed to the block succeeding the each call.


In fn.call(pair[0], pair[1]), the lambda passed to the function is called with two arguments: the first and last name provided by the each iteration. This lambda is assumed to return some value. In this case, the lambda returns a concatenated string, so the expression partially evaluates to something like this:

result << "Christopher Alexander"

From here, the << overloaded operator indicates that the right operand should be pushed onto the left operand (an array).

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Thank you I think the main issue was I was getting confused by the .call and the hash/array question, thanks for breaking it down – Tom May 14 '12 at 19:12

Are the names entered between line 3's first [ and line 5's ] held in an array or a hash?

It is an array of arrays, i.e., each element of the array is another array which contains two strings. So

result.first
=> ["Christopher", "Alexander"]

The lambda is a method which takes two arguments and formats them as a string.

when calling `.each do |pair| we are iterating through each array in the hash, is this correct?

As I explained, there are no hashes here. It is simply iterating over the array and each element is itself an array with two elements (the first name and last name). result is filled with the return value(s) of the lambda method.

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