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I want to do a slide from left (or right) animation with my UIView like how it is done in Photos.app while you browse thorough photos by swiping left and right.

I know the following basic animation transaction code.

[UIView beginAnimations:@"ThisAnimation" context:nil];
[UIView setAnimationCurve:UIViewAnimationCurveEaseOut];
[UIView setAnimationDuration:1];
[UIView setAnimationTransition:UIViewAnimationTransitionCurlUp forView:self.view cache:YES];    

[UIView commitAnimations];

Is it possible to do slide from left (or right) animation using setAnimationTransaction? If not, how can I do it?

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If you want to replicate the Photos app's behavior you might want to use a UIScrollView with scrollView.pagingEnabled = YES instead. This way you'll get instant feedback once you start dragging the image. Using transition will require the user to finish a whole swipe gesture before the transition can be triggered. –  DrummerB May 14 '12 at 19:01

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In addition to the other answer, you can find a cool tutorial here and there is a link to the project at the end of the tutorial so you can take a look at it.

This is an automatic slideshow, but you can disable it by commenting the line where the NSTimer is defined. Also you should had the next line in the viewDidLoad for a better UX :

scr.pagingEnabled = YES;

Hope it helps

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I think what you're after is a scroll view with paging enabled to be the main view that contains subviews for each of your photos. With paging enabled (the default value for this boolean property is NO), the view will always "snap" to a multiple of its bounds, so the user is always either on one section of the scroll view or another (like in Photos, or on the Home screen).

You can set the pagingEnabled property of the UIScrollView to be true to gain this effect. You will then always have multiples of the bounds of the UIScrollView shown at a time (which you could fill with a view for a photo, such as a UIImageView).

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