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I'd like to know how to list a directory in this format. normal list structure:

#find . -follow -type f | sed "s/.//"

/files/test1/test2/file1.txt
/files/test1/test2/file2.txt
/files/test1/test2/file3.txt
/files/test1/file1.txt
/files/test1/file2.txt
/files/test1/file3.txt
/files/file1.txt
/files/file2.txt
/files/file3.txt
/file1.txt
/file2.txt
/file3.txt

I would like I would list as follows:

/files/test1/test2/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt
/files/test1/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt
/files/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt
/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt

like this:

 ls -R1 | sed -e 's/://' -e 's/.//'

but would like the structure explained above!

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2  
man tree ..... –  William Pursell May 14 '12 at 19:07
    
What have you tried? –  user unknown May 14 '12 at 19:13
    
look closely at how I wish! look at the first line of each! –  Júlio Jamil May 14 '12 at 19:21
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2 Answers 2

... | while read path; do 
    dir=$(dirname "$path")
    if [[ $dir = $prev ]]; then 
        echo $(basename "$path")
    else 
        echo $path
        prev=$dir
    fi
done
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look at the model above! want to list files, not directories! –  Júlio Jamil May 14 '12 at 21:44
    
Did you try it? How does it fail to produce your desired output? –  glenn jackman May 15 '12 at 0:00
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Interesting quiz !

Setup sample dirs and files

mkdir -p files/test1/test2 && for P in . files files/test1 files/test1/test2; do touch "$P"/file{1,2,3}.txt; done

As an one-liner, try

find . -type d | sort -r | while read P; do printf "${P#.*}"/; ls -v | while read F; do echo ${F##*/}; done; done

Output is like your request

/files/test1/test2/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt

/files/test1/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt

/files/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt

/file1.txt
file2.txt
file3.txt

A lot of fun to solve that.

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did not work! he repeats the first 3 files. to test, change the names of files within the subdirectories! –  Júlio Jamil May 15 '12 at 22:29
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