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I'm working with the Twitter search widget and currently I have the javascript embedded in the within the body tags of the HTML, something like this:

<body>
 <script charset="utf-8" src="https://widgets.twimg.com/j/2/widget.js"></script>
 <script>
        new TWTR.Widget({
                  version: 2,
                  type: 'faves',
                  rpp: 1,
                  interval: 7200000,
                  title: '',
                  subject: '',
                  width: 500,
                  height: 65,
                  theme: {
                    shell: {
                      background: '#a4c9b9',
                      color: '#ffffff'
                    },
                    tweets: {
                      background: '#a4c9b9',
                      color: '#ffffff',
                      links: '#444444'
                    }
                  },
                  features: {
                    scrollbar: true,
                    loop: false,
                    live: false,
                    behavior: 'all'
                  }
                }).render().setUser('exampleuser').start();
     </script>
 </body>

Instead though, I'd rather move all that javascript to the header (or maybe the footer?) tag, then simply have it rendered in the body without the tags. Is there a simple way to do this?

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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use one of either native JS...

window.onload = function() {
    // your code here
};

or jQuery...

$(document).ready(function() {
    // your code here
});

...to ensure the code will not run until the document has finished loading.

This explains the slight difference between window.onload and $(document).ready().

Another option would be to wrap your code in a named function and call it in the body somewhere but you would still have to put it in <script> tags.

EDIT: Using window.onload...

<html>
<head>
<script>
window.onload = function() {
    new TWTR.Widget({
              version: 2,
              type: 'faves',
              rpp: 1,
              interval: 7200000,
              title: '',
              subject: '',
              width: 500,
              height: 65,
              theme: {
                shell: {
                  background: '#a4c9b9',
                  color: '#ffffff'
                },
                tweets: {
                  background: '#a4c9b9',
                  color: '#ffffff',
                  links: '#444444'
                }
              },
              features: {
                scrollbar: true,
                loop: false,
                live: false,
                behavior: 'all'
              }
            }).render().setUser('exampleuser').start();
};
</script>
</head>
<body></body></html>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. Could you explain some on how to implement either of these? I don't have much familiarity with javascript. –  user839924 May 15 '12 at 14:07
    
To clarify, so if I define the function in the <head> with window.onload, how do I call it in the body? –  user839924 May 15 '12 at 14:18
    
You don't have to call it yourself. window.onload is an event-listener. It will monitor the page and call the function automatically when the page is finished loading. –  pdizz May 15 '12 at 14:57
    
Gotcha! Well sort of. Both worked great but I ended using the jQuery one. Then I added an 'id' attribute to the widget code, set it as 'twitter_div', then just called that div id in the body. –  user839924 May 15 '12 at 15:54
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