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I have a question regarding exceptions in a medium-sized Java web application. There is a data access layer implemented using JDBC with the logic concentrated mostly in a servlet (the UI is JSP). What is a conventional exceptions' hierarchy for applications like this?

Should I catch the exceptions on data access layer and rethrow another exception for the whole (e.g. DataAccessException) or simply let the highest level handle them (servlet).

Additionally, I have a connection pool that is called within data access layer and it has its own type of exceptions. Should these exceptions be caught inside data access layer and be rethrown as DataAccessException, or should be handled by higher levels directly?

Would it be a good idea to have a main application exception with the 2 children: LogicException and TechnicalException. Logic will have the subclasses similar to AuthentificationFailedException and so on, while the TechnicalExceptions will be responsible for conveying the information about failures like a data access layer exception, FileNotFound (while it should be) and so on?

Thank you!

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Is there a tag for these kind of questions? Question about how to structure you code on a large scale? I find this subject very interesting and in big need for a good forum. –  Ludwig Magnusson May 14 '12 at 20:13
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4 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Generally I wrap lower level exceptions with higher level, more meaningful exceptions. This is usually more work, but gives you decoupling between layers.

Imagine I am writing a configuration subsystem that happens to read from database. If I don't wrap, I would have something like:

public String getConfigurationProperty(String name) throws SQLException {
    // Try to read from my configuration table
}

If I do the wrapping, I would have

public String getConfigurationProperty(String name) throws ConfigurationException {
    try {
        // Try to read from my configuration table 
    } catch (SQLException ex) {
        ConfigurationException wrapper = // Some subclass of ConfigurationException that wraps ex
        throw wrapper;
    }
}

This is definitely more work. The advantage is that if at a later time I want to change my configuration backend to, say, a file based one, without wrappers my method would become

public String getConfigurationProperty(String name) throws IOException {
    // Try to read from my configuration file
}

And then I would have to change all my client code to deal with IOExceptions instead of SQLExceptions. If you do the wrapping, you just need to change the backend, because your client code was already written with ConfigurationExceptions and its subclasses in mind. Note that this is independent of wether you use checked or unchecked exceptions: if you want to do exception handling, you almost always need to know at least some approximation for the type of exceptions you want to handle.

Now, this is what I tend to do. There is people that thinks that most exceptions cannot be properly handled anyway and all these wrapping is nonsense most of the time.

public String getConfigurationProperty(String name) throws ConfigurationException {
    try {
        // Try to read from my configuration file 
    } catch (IOException ex) {
        ConfigurationException wrapper = // Some subclass of ConfigurationException that wraps ex
        throw wrapper;
    }
}
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In the applications I've seen all the exceptions were catched in the layer which threw them, wrapped in a more generic exception (in your case DataAccessException) and then re-thrown that way. That's because usually the layer in which the exception is raised has not enough information on the context, so it can't decide how to handle the error in a proper way. The best place to handle those exception is the layer which lies RIGHT ABOVE the layer where the exception was thrown: it has enough information to "fail gracefully" without letting that exception go too far on the stack strace. In your case catching the exceptions in the servlet would do the work.

But the hierarchy of the exceptions depends on the application you're working on. Your Logical-Technical division might be a good choice... or might not. :) There's no "right" choice in "exception handling", and it's a too complex argument to deal with in a single Q&A pair. :)

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I am also involved in developing a medium size web application. The method we have used is the one where we throw the exceptions from the database layer up to the servlet handling the logic which catches them and produces the correct error message to the user.

This is.... not the way to go IMO. Reason: The entire servlet is now dependent on the implementation. Let's say that we want to switch the implementation (which we want to at the moment). We now need to change every catch in the rest of the servet because the new implementation will not throw the same exceptions. Generic exceptions is the right choice.

Not only exceptions but business object as well should be generic. Preferably interfaces. This would allow you to change the implementation more easilly while your locig-handling code will depend on the same objects through your servlets entire lifetime.

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A way to deal with the dependencies created by exception handling is a "direct superclass handler": you may create a parent class, let's say "DataAccessException", and that will be the exception you'll catch in your try-catch blocks. But your layer will throw a direct subclass of that exception, let's say "DataAccessImpl_1Exception". In this way the exception is handled, and the dependency bind is far more loose: you may implement another "DataAccessImpl_2Exception" and still have your exception catched... of course there are pros and cons... :) –  shuuchan May 14 '12 at 20:33
    
Yes but this is only possible if I write the exception beeing thrown. If I use a third party library I can't make their exceptions extend mine. –  Ludwig Magnusson May 14 '12 at 20:36
    
Yes, but you may catch and wrap all those exception in a "middle layer" and rethrow any exception you'd like. Just look at the example posted by gpeche. Obviously you'll have to write more code, but that code is usually enough decoupled to allow you "implementation switches" in an easy way, and it's worth the effort if you think that those "switches" may happen sooner or later. –  shuuchan May 14 '12 at 20:44
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In general, in any given layer of the application, you want the exception caught to be meaningful to that layer. So, you don't want to be catching a SybaseException in your Servlet (or MVC Controller), because presumably you have a DAO layer to hide that level of implementation detail.

Couple general tips:

  • You should configure your apache+servlet container to return a sensible page on a 500 error.
  • Your controllers should wrap most errors with a user friendly message. The caught exception should provide enough information for the controller to formulate a sensible message.
  • I would consider subclassing RuntimeException with a base application exception, which contains both a technical error message, as well as a localized user error message.
  • Think about what you want to do with an exception, when you catch it. Design your exceptions so that it will be straightforward to do what you need to.

Last, and not everyone will agree with this, but you can make a strong case for making all your exceptions subclass RuntimeException, so that they are unchecked. I've worked on many large codebases that take this approach, and it generally works fine, and cuts down on a lot of catch-rethrow boilerplate code. Just because java provides checked exceptions, doesn't mean that you have to use them. This is my opinion obviously, but it's important to realize that not everyone uses checked exceptions, and in fact, many codebases will explicitly avoid them.

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