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What if I had something like a double linked list in a relational database, for example:

node_id    left_id    right_id

1          null       2
2          1          3
3          2          null

Then I have some SQLAlchemy code like the following:

class NodeClass(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'nodes_table'
    node_id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    left_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('nodes_table.node_id'))
    right_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('nodes_table.node_id'))
    left = relationship('NodeClass') # Wrong
    right = relationship('NodeClass') # Wrong

If I have node_id 2, and I call NodeClass.left I would like to receive node_id 1 in return. How can I configure the SQLAlchemy relationships to behave this way?

UPDATE:

I will give a second example. Consider a table of people, and each person has a mother and a father.

person_id    mother_id    father_id

1            null         null
2            null         null
3            1            2

The SQLAlchemy code:

class PersonClass(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'persons_table'
    person_id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)
    mother_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('persons_table.person_id'))
    father_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('persons_table.person_id'))
    mother = relation('PersonClass') # Wrong
    father = relation('PersonClass') # Wrong
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The code below shows how to configure the relationship:

class NodeClass(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'nodes_table'
    node_id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    left_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('nodes_table.node_id'))
    left = relationship('NodeClass', remote_side=[node_id],
            primaryjoin=('NodeClass.left_id==NodeClass.node_id'),
            backref=backref("right", uselist=False),
            #lazy="joined", join_depth=9,
            )

But few things should be noted:

  • only one end of the relationship is stored, the other is inferred. This might not be what you want, but it is much more simple to manage, and it is enough to set one side only myNode.left = myOtherNode and the other (right) will be set automatically (because of configured backref)
  • if both ends are stored (right and left), then
    • both ends would need to be set in code and one has to ensure they are consistent, which might not be a trivial task
    • the insert of two nodes that are linked would require insert-1, insert-2, update-1 in case your primary key is computed on the database, as it is unknown during the first insert.

UPDATE: Sample code to the UPDATE part of the question (but still using the original class name). One needs only to specify the primaryjoin and uselist=False:

class NodeClass(Base):
    __tablename__ = 'nodes_table'
    node_id = Column(Integer, primary_key=True)

    left_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('nodes_table.node_id'))
    right_id = Column(Integer, ForeignKey('nodes_table.node_id'))

    left = relationship('NodeClass', primaryjoin = ('NodeClass.left_id == NodeClass.node_id'), use_list=False)
    right = relationship('NodeClass', primaryjoin = ('NodeClass.right_id == NodeClass.node_id'), use_list=False)
share|improve this answer
    
The double linked list example was the simplest example I could come up with. In reality I have more complicated data, and I can't change the database schema. The main concern I had was the multiple self-referential foreign keys, but you have removed them from the problem, so your solution isn't directly applicable. Still, it gives me a good starting point. –  Buttons840 May 15 '12 at 16:29
    
@Buttons840: your second example is pretty easy to answer now: for each relationship (father/month, or left/right) you need to specify the join condition via primaryjoin clause. I will add to the answer shortly. –  van May 15 '12 at 19:25
    
I'm having trouble with the primaryjoin. Since both operands on the equals ( == ) are NodeClass, how does it know which NodeClass is the current Node, and which NodeClass is the related Node? When I ask for 'left' it can be interpreted as "give me another node who's id equals my left_id" or "give me another node who's left_id equals my id". The are opposite. I've tried this and it doesn't work. I think I need to use an aliased table, but I don't know how to do that in a declarative class. –  Buttons840 May 15 '12 at 19:55
1  
it guesses, and I believe it does so correctly in this case. But if can always specify it using the remote_side argument, which I used in the first example. Read Adjacency List Relationships for more information on this one. –  van May 16 '12 at 9:04

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