Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the follow CRC function:

unsigned long Checksummer::crc32 (unsigned long crc, char *buf, unsigned long len)
{
   unsigned long crc_table[256];
   int i, k;
   for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
      unsigned long c = (unsigned long) i;
      for (k = 0; k < 8; k++) 
         c = c & 1 ? 0xedb88320 ^ (c >> 1) : c >> 1;
      crc_table[i] = c;
   }

   crc = crc ^ 0xffffffffL;
   while (len--) 
      crc = crc_table[((int)crc ^ (*buf++)) & 0xff] ^ (crc >> 8);
   return crc ^ 0xffffffffL;
}

I am trying to port this code to Java so that I can calculate CRCs on multiple platforms. My ported code below produces a different result. What am I doing wrong?

static long getCrc32 (long crc, char[] buf, long len)
{
   long crc_table[] = new long[256];
   int i, k;
   for (i = 0; i < 256; i++) {
      long c = ( long)i;
      for (k = 0; k < 8; k++) 
         c = (c & 1) == 1 ? 0xedb88320 ^ (c >> 1) : c >> 1;
      crc_table[i] = c;
    }

    /* Calculate crc on buf */
    crc = crc ^ 0xffffffffL;
    int j = 0;
    while (len-- != 0){ 
       crc = crc_table[((int)crc ^ (buf[(int)j++])) & 0xff] ^ (crc >> 8);}
    return crc ^ 0xffffffffL;
}
share|improve this question
    
I can give you an advice to test >> operator in java. probably, it is acting the different way, than in cpp(i.e. there is no unsigned integers in java –  undefined May 14 '12 at 20:59
1  
long is signed in Java. So, >> returns different result for some values in C and in Java. –  qehgt May 14 '12 at 21:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

char is two bytes in Java; use byte instead (char in C and C++ are one byte by definition).

long is eight bytes in Java; use int instead (assuming sizeof(unsigned long) == 4 on your C++ platform, which is the norm).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks!, this with >>> was able to solve issue –  user1394661 May 15 '12 at 1:11

One problem I see is this line:

c = (c & 1) == 1 ? 0xedb88320 ^ (c >> 1) : c >> 1;

In C++, c&1 is true iff it's not zero; it doesn't have to be 1.

Additionally, you should probably use >>> instead of >>. The former always shifts a 0 into the leftmost bit, just like the C operator >> does for unsign.

share|improve this answer
2  
"In C++, c&1 is true iff it's not zero; it doesn't have to be 1." What else could it be other than 0 or 1? (Not downvoting, but this makes zero sense.) –  ildjarn May 14 '12 at 21:14
    
Oops, that's what I get for not thinking before responding. Sorry :( –  ideasrule May 14 '12 at 21:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.