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When I compile my code in C, I get the following error "error LNK2001: unresolved external symbol _staff" and also an error about unresolved externals. It sounds like it thinks my staff array needs an external file, but its just an array for holding Persons (a Union of two types). How do I fix the problem? The beginning of my code is below.

        #include <stdio.h>
        #include <string.h>
    //employee struct

        typedef struct {    
        //...
        } Employee;

    //Manager struct inheriting from employee struct

        typedef struct {
        Employee employee;   
        int bonus;
        } Manager;  

    //union of manager and employee

        typedef union{
           Employee e;
           Manager m;
          } Person;
    //functions

        Employee newEmployee(char n[], ...);    
        Manager newManager(...);
        double getManagerSalary(Manager man);    
        Manager boss; 
        Employee harry ;
        Employee tommy;
        Person staff[];

//main code

    int main(void)
    {

      boss = newManager(...);
      harry = newEmployee(...);       
      tommy = newEmployee(...);

      staff[3]; 
      staff[0].m = boss;
      staff[1].e = harry;
      staff[2].e = tommy;

     ...    
    }   

    Employee newEmployee(char n[], double s, int year, int month, int day)
    {
    ...
    }
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closed as too localized by Linus Kleen, WhozCraig, Explosion Pills, dreamcrash, SztupY Dec 13 '12 at 0:36

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1  
is this the whole code producing the error? how could it be? –  ShinTakezou May 14 '12 at 21:06
4  
(and about Person staff[], it is not an array you can populate with anything... consider it just like a "placeholder" for an array, it should be [1] to have room for 1 element) –  ShinTakezou May 14 '12 at 21:09
    
"Inheriting"? That's not inheritance and anyway there's no inheritance in C. Post the error the compiler throws. –  m0skit0 May 14 '12 at 21:11
    
I suppose it is used in a general way, not in the technical sense; however, newManager(...) is not allowed in C, it is in C++ if I remember well... –  ShinTakezou May 14 '12 at 21:12
    
(and still about Person staff[];, it is not correct unless it references an actual array; so likely your compiler is "placing" a extern before it, hence your error; gcc does not do so, it gives error) –  ShinTakezou May 14 '12 at 21:14

2 Answers 2

Arrays have to be declared in C to have a size Eg: Person a[1] which means a is an array of 1 Person. You cannot declare it in the way you have done.

If you want to estimate the number of Persons at runtime try pointers. Do Person *a then allocate memory considering the total number of Persons and proceed But I don't think you want to do this.

Also see the extern message by @ShinTakezou. Its an important and valid point though totally unrelated to your implementation.

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        // you are not reserving room for anything;
        // gcc would give an error; your compiler silently consider this
        // staff as a pointer to something (an array) which has its actual
        // memory defined elsewhere; so, when you link, it raises that 
        // linking error
        Person staff[];

        // could be
        Person staff[N];
        // where N is a positive number, or a true define or const value

//main code

    int main(void)
    {

      boss = newManager(...);
      harry = newEmployee(...);       
      tommy = newEmployee(...);

      // the following line is an expresion which does nothing:
      // it accesses the fourth element of a "supposed" array,
      // and the value retrieved in this way is lost
      // if you meant to "allocate" three staff, you are doing it wrong; 
      staff[3]; 

      // following the possible previous path of having the 
      // room for staff not dynamically created, you don't need the
      // previous line, which is simply a no-op (if 3 is less than N-1, 
      // otherwise it's a potentially illegal access to memory you shouldn't access)

      staff[0].m = boss;
      staff[1].e = harry;
      staff[2].e = tommy;

     ...    
    }   

(I also add that the code does not look totally "sane" —needless to say maybe— to me, but this could be the matter of another question, unrelated to this specific problem)

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