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As we know, local variables have local scope and lifetime. Consider the following code:

      int* abc()
      {
            int m;
            return(&m);
       }
       void main()
       {
             int* p=abc();
             *p=32;
        }

This gives me a warning that a function returns the address of a local variable. I see this as justification: Local veriable m is deallocated once abc() completes. So we are dereferencing an invalid memory location in the main function.

However, consider the following code:

      int* abc()
      {
           int m;
           return(&m);
           int p=9;
       }
       void main()
       {
           int* p=abc();
           *p=32;
       }

Here I am getting the same warning. But I guess that m will still retain its lifetime when returning. What is happening? Please explain the error. Is my justification wrong?

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5  
Why do you think that m should stay alive in the second version? –  sepp2k May 14 '12 at 21:28
4  
There is no difference between your two code snippets. –  Krizz May 14 '12 at 21:29
6  
@Krizz Sure there's a difference: In the second version abc() contains an unreachable definition of a local variable called p and in the first it doesn't. There's just no relevant difference. </smart-ass-mode> –  sepp2k May 14 '12 at 21:31
3  
Please read the faq and learn how to accept answers. Then apply that knowledge to this question and your earlier ones. –  David Heffernan May 14 '12 at 22:21
2  
Your expectations for the second snippet are extremely bizarre and are based on very wrong but undeterminable assumptions about how C works. For us to be helpful, you would have to explain in detail why you think adding the utterly irrelevant int p=9; has any bearing on anything. –  Jim Balter May 15 '12 at 8:26

5 Answers 5

First, notice that int p=9; will never be reached, so your two versions are functionally identical. The program will allocate memory for m and return the address of that memory; any code below the return statement is unreacheable.

Second, the local variable m is not actually de-allocated after the function returns. Rather, the program considers the memory free space. That space might be used for another purpose, or it might stay unused and forever hold its old value. Because you have no guarantee about what happens to the memory once the abc() function exits, you should not attempt to access or modify it in any way.

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3  
Welcome to Stack Overflow, and thanks for posting such a thorough and well-explained answer! –  Cody Gray May 14 '12 at 21:35

As soon as return keyword is encountered, control passes back to the caller and the called function goes out of scope. Hence, all local variables are popped off the stack. So the last statement in your second example is inconsequential and the warning is justified

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Logically, m no longer exists when you return from the function, and any reference to it is invalid once the function exits.

Physically, the picture is a bit more complicated. The memory cells that m occupied are certainly still there, and if you access those cells before anything else has a chance to write to them, they'll contain the value that was written to them in the function, so under the right circumstances it's possible for you to read what was stored in m through p after abc has returned. Do not rely on this behavior being repeatable; it is a coding error.

From the language standard (C99):

6.2.4 Storage durations of objects
...
2 The lifetime of an object is the portion of program execution during which storage is guaranteed to be reserved for it. An object exists, has a constant address,25) and retains its last-stored value throughout its lifetime.26) If an object is referred to outside of its lifetime, the behavior is undefined. The value of a pointer becomes indeterminate when the object it points to reaches the end of its lifetime.
25) The term ‘‘constant address’’ means that two pointers to the object constructed at possibly different times will compare equal. The address may be different during two different executions of the same program.

26) In the case of a volatile object, the last store need not be explicit in the program.

Emphasis mine. Basically, you're doing something that the language definition explicitly calls out as undefined behavior, meaning the compiler is free to handle that situation any way it wants to. It can issue a diagnostic (which your compiler is doing), it can translate the code without issuing a diagnostic, it can halt translation at that point, etc.

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The only way you can make m still valid memory (keeping the maximum resemblance with your code) when you exit the function, is to prepend it with the static keyword

int* abc()
{
           static int m;
           m = 42;
           return &m;
}

Anything after a return is a "dead branch" that won't be ever executed.

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int m should be locally visible. You should create it as int* m and return it directly.

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