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This is probably more a Pascal question than an Inno Setup question. How come when I do this:

floatnum := 652;

The actual value stored in the float is 6.5200000 and not 652.000000?

Update: It's been pointed out that 6.52 is actually 652 which is confusing to me so I guess I should be more specific. Here is some code I have trouble with:

floatnum := 305 / 600;

I would expect that floatnum would hold close to 0.5083333 but it doesn't, instead holding 5.08333325. That doesn't look right to me. What am I missing?

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Could you show a bit more code? Converting integer to float (in Innosetup or Pascal) does not arbitrarily "divide by 100". There must be something else going on here... IMHO... –  paulsm4 May 14 '12 at 21:54
    
@paul that's the code. I have floatnum declared as floatnum: Single; When I view it in the debugger after the assignment it says 6.5200000. –  test May 14 '12 at 22:27
    
TLama gave you the correct answer (which, btw, I would never have guessed). It's NOT showing you "6.52". It's showing "6.52 * 10^2"! –  paulsm4 May 15 '12 at 2:20
    
PS: Cool video you might enjoy: Powers of Ten –  paulsm4 May 15 '12 at 2:21
    
@all I didn't realize that. I have marked the answer as correct. Thanks –  test May 15 '12 at 3:19
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I think you just missed the whole debugger's value interpratation. See the following screenshot:

enter image description here

The value of 6.52000000000000E+0002 is actually 652 what confirms also the next line:

enter image description here

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I still don't get it. I updated my question. 6.52 should be 6.52 how is it 652? –  test May 15 '12 at 0:51
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If you assign value 652 then it is represented as 6.52 x 10^2. –  TLama May 15 '12 at 0:59
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This is called scientific notication. –  Deanna May 15 '12 at 11:13
    
@Deanna In C I could do this float floatnum = 652; and it would show 652.000000. I completely missed the exponent in Inno although it's fairly obvious, since it's right there :) –  test May 15 '12 at 17:40
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