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Not a big user of RegEx - never really understood them! However, I feel the best way to check input for a username field would be with one that only allows Letters (upper or lower), numbers and the _ character, and must start with a letter as per the site policy. The My RegEx and code is as such:

var theCheck = /[a-zA-Z]|\d|_$/g;
alert(theCheck.test(theUsername));

Despite trying with various combinations, everything is returning "true".

Can anyone help?

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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Your regex is saying "does theUsername contain a letter, digit, or end with underscore".

Try this instead:

var theCheck = /^[a-z]([a-z_\d]*)$/i; // the "i" is "ignore case"

This says "theUsername starts with a letter and only contains letters, digits, or underscores".

Note: I don't think you need the "g" here, that means "all matches". We just want to test the whole string.

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Bonus, OP should search for common regex patterns. Pretty sure others have gone thru that pain –  Alfabravo May 14 '12 at 22:57
    
Does this force the first character to be a letter? –  tip2tail May 14 '12 at 22:59
    
@tip2tail: It does now, it didn't before. –  Rocket Hazmat May 14 '12 at 22:59
    
@Rocket - thanks for your help. –  tip2tail May 14 '12 at 23:05
    
@Alfabravo - as I alluded to in my first post I'm really effin dumb when it comes to RegEx. I did search, copied and pasted for the last hour and a half but got nowhere fast. In 10 mins here I'm now light years ahead in terms of my project. Thanks tho! ;o) –  tip2tail May 14 '12 at 23:05
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How about something like this:

^([a-zA-Z][a-zA-Z0-9_]{3,})$

To explain the entire pattern:

^ = Makes sure that the first pattern in brackets is at the beginning
() = puts the entire pattern in a group in case you need to pull it out and not just validate
a-zA-Z0-9_ = matches your character allowances
$ = Makes sure that this must be the entire line
{3,} = Makes sure there are a minimum of 3 characters. 
    You can add a number after the comma for a character limit max
    You could also use a +, which would merely enforce at least one character match the second pattern. A * would not enforce any lengths
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Overkill in the length of the second block. A '+' should do (we don't know how long should it be) –  Alfabravo May 14 '12 at 22:58
    
@Alfabravo I am actually about to add some explanation. However, I would hope it would be at least 2+ characters –  Justin Pihony May 14 '12 at 23:01
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Use this as your regex:

^[A-Za-z][a-zA-Z0-9_]*$
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Wouldn't that match a blank string? –  Rocket Hazmat May 14 '12 at 22:57
    
Oh yeah... Oops. I also forgot about "it must start with a letter". –  jahroy May 14 '12 at 22:57
    
@jahroy BTW, this will not deal with the it must start with, and that the entire line must be correct –  Justin Pihony May 15 '12 at 0:07
    
You are correct. Fixed it. –  jahroy May 15 '12 at 4:19
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