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Guys im searching about difference between composition and inheritance then I found this post somewhere.

According to the post composition is better than inheritance in code reuse.

class Fruit {

    // Return int number of pieces of peel that
    // resulted from the peeling activity.
    public int peel() {

        System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
        return 1;
    }
}

class Apple {

    private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

    public int peel() {
        return fruit.peel();
    }
}

class Example2 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

change the back-end class

class Peel {

    private int peelCount;

    public Peel(int peelCount) {
        this.peelCount = peelCount;
    }

    public int getPeelCount() {

        return peelCount;
    }
    //...
}

class Fruit {

    // Return int number of pieces of peel that
    // resulted from the peeling activity.
    public Peel peel() {

        System.out.println("Peeling is appealing.");
        return new Peel(1);
    }
}

// Apple must be changed to accomodate // the change to Fruit

class Apple {

    private Fruit fruit = new Fruit();

    public int peel() {

        Peel peel = fruit.peel();
        return peel.getPeelCount();
    }
}

// This old implementation of Example2 // still works fine.

class Example1 {

    public static void main(String[] args) {

        Apple apple = new Apple();
        int pieces = apple.peel();
    }
}

This is what I didnt get according to the post is says "if the interface of the back-end class change, the implementation of the front-end class also change but not its interface".

whats the interface here whats the implementation?

THIS IS JUST MY ASSUMPTION TELL ME JUST IF IM WRONG??(MAYBE ALL IS WRONG).

Is the back-end class the interface because front-end class depends on it?
Is the implementation of front-end class the implementation code inside the front-end class?
Is front-end class also an interface because the code inside Example depends on it?

Are they lousely coupled because change to back-end interface didnt make change to front-end interface? So the code that depends on front-end interface still works.

If I use inheritance instead is subclass tightly coupled in superclass? Because change to superclass will also change to subclass so code that depends on subclass will may not work.

Wny inheritance is weak encapsulation.

share|improve this question
    
If you could link the article in question it might help us understand the point being made. –  jhsowter May 15 '12 at 0:45
    
You say this is an example comparing inheritance and composition, but there is no inheritance...please post source. –  Garrett Hall May 15 '12 at 1:04
    
Source: artima.com/designtechniques/compoinh.html –  Garrett Hall May 15 '12 at 1:06

1 Answer 1

This is the intuitive inheritance relationship which should be going on between Apple and Fruit. However, this is not what the above example has done.

enter image description here

The above example is using composition, which means that Fruit is part of Apple (see uml here). This is pretty counter-intuitive! In this case, both Fruit and Apple has separate implementations of peel. The implementation of peel() in Apple uses Fruit.peel().

enter image description here

I think the point being made is that if Apple uses a composition relationship with Fruit, then it's implementation can be independent of Fruit. For example, instead of using Fruit.peel() to get the count for Apple.peel(), I could use some other implementation. But if Apple inherits peel from Fruit, then a change in Fruit also changes Apple. Therefore Apple is not independent of Fruit, so we say it is tightly coupled.

It's a bad example in a couple of ways, 1) we all know that an apple is a fruit, so inheritance seems like the most correct implementation. 2) Inheritance appears to be the most DRY way to implement things, since using composition requires you to correct the Apple class to do the same thing as Fruit when the change is made to Fruit.peel().

EDIT: Having read the article, I feel the main point is to outline the pitfalls of using inheritance. There is nothing wrong with using inheritance appropriately. Using it simply for the sake of code reuse could cause problems if the child classes don't really inherit behaviour from the super class.

To answer your questions!

Is the back-end class the interface because front-end class depends on it?

Close enough. All classes have an "interface." This doesn't mean they literally have implements IFruit in their class declaration, it just refers to the shape of the object - what methods that objects has, regardless of how those methods work.

Is the implementation of front-end class the implementation code inside the front-end class?

Roughly, yes. The actual logic of the code which makes up the body of the methods in a class is that class' implementation.

Is front-end class also an interface because the code inside Example depends on it?

Pretty much. Apple has an interface, implicitly, just like any other class. If Example uses the Apple class, then it can only do so by using methods which are part of the interface.

Are they lousely coupled because change to back-end interface didnt make change to front-end interface?

Yeah, that's one way of using the phrase "loosely coupled."

If I use inheritance instead is subclass tightly coupled in superclass? Because change to superclass will also change to subclass so code that depends on subclass will may not work.

Yes that's right. The two classes are tightly coupled in that they are their behaviour is not entirely encapsulated in each separate class. This isn't always wrong, it depends on the situation.

Wny inheritance is weak encapsulation.[sic]

Because the behaviour is shared between the superclass and the subclass.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Yes, very bad example, it shouldn't be #1 on Google. BTW what UML tool are you using? –  Garrett Hall May 15 '12 at 1:34
    
I am using yuml. But it got mucked up when I edited the post and I had to add them in again. –  jhsowter May 15 '12 at 1:51

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