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I can do the following inside of my ViewModel class:

var inc = 100.0d / total;

Parallel.ForEach(enumeration, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 8 },
    item =>
    {
        //Do Parallel Tasks

        lock (ProgressLock)
        {
            WorkProgress += inc; //This raises a PropertyChanged event (binding).
        }
    });

What I'm having trouble doing is getting each parallel task to be UI responsive. Any assistance would be great. Thanks!

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Don't lock in a parallel task. Instead, use AsParallel.Sum(). –  SLaks May 15 '12 at 0:46
    
What does "each parallel task to be UI responsive" mean? –  SLaks May 15 '12 at 0:46
    
I want my application to take advantage of parallel processors, while also being able to use the WPF UI Dispatcher. I want the actual tasks that I do to be on the UI Thread. –  m-y May 15 '12 at 0:51
    
Also, I'm not sure I can do a AsParallel.Sum() ... where exactly would that considering that part of my task is to increment a counter. –  m-y May 15 '12 at 0:53
1  
@m-y You can still run the process on background threads. WPF will automatically handle the binding of a simple number without having to marshal it... If you need something more complex, use Dispatcher.BeginInvoke to marshal back to the UI. –  Reed Copsey May 15 '12 at 1:12

2 Answers 2

You cannot use multi-threading while also staying on one thread.

Instead, you can use the Dispatcher to invoke the property setter on the UI thread.

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You can't run the Parallel.ForEach on the dispatcher thread. It will block the thread until the entire process has completed, at which time, your bindings will update.

If you need to have the bindings update as this executes, you could wrap the entire process into a background task. As long as WorkProgress is a simple number, the binding should behave property if it's set in a background thread.

This could be as simple as:

Task.Factory.StartNew( () =>
{
  Parallel.ForEach(enumeration, new ParallelOptions { MaxDegreeOfParallelism = 8 },
   item =>
   {
    //Do Parallel Tasks

    lock (ProgressLock)
    {
        WorkProgress += inc; //This raises a PropertyChanged event (binding).
    }
   });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Won't this defeat the purpose of parallel tasks? Basically, do I have to pick one or the other (UI thread or parallel thread)? –  m-y May 15 '12 at 0:55
    
@m-y No. "Parallel" is meant to run MANY things at the same time. You can't execute multiple things on a single thread (the UI thread). This will cause the operations to all run simulatenously, and not block the UI thread. –  Reed Copsey May 15 '12 at 0:57

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