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Let's imagine we have a struct for holding 3 doubles with some member functions:

struct Vector {
  double x, y, z;
  // ...
  Vector &negate() {
    x = -x; y = -y; z = -z;
    return *this;
  }
  Vector &normalize() {
     double s = 1./sqrt(x*x+y*y+z*z);
     x *= s; y *= s; z *= s;
     return *this;
  }
  // ...
};

This is a little contrived for simplicity, but I'm sure you agree that similar code is out there. The methods allow you to conveniently chain, for example:

Vector v = ...;
v.normalize().negate();

Or even:

Vector v = Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize().negate();

Now if we provided begin() and end() functions, we could use our Vector in a new-style for loop, say to loop over the 3 coordinates x, y, and z (you can no doubt construct more "useful" examples by replacing Vector with e.g. String):

Vector v = ...;
for (double x : v) { ... }

We can even do:

Vector v = ...;
for (double x : v.normalize().negate()) { ... }

and also:

for (double x : Vector{1., 2., 3.}) { ... }

However, the following (it seems to me) is broken:

for (double x : Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize()) { ... }

While it seems like a logical combination of the previous two usages, I think this last usage creates a dangling reference while the previous two are completely fine.

  • Is this correct and Widely appreciated?
  • Which part of the above is the "bad" part, that should be avoided?
  • Would the language be improved by changing the definition of the range-based for loop such that temporaries constructed in the for-expression exist for the duration of the loop?
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For some reason I recall a very similar question being asked before, forgot what it was called though. –  Pubby May 15 '12 at 3:31
    
I consider this a language defect. The life of temporaries is not extended to the entire body of the for-loop, but only for setup of the for loop. It's not just the range syntax which suffers, the classic syntax does as well. In my opinion the life of temporaries in the init statement should extend for the full life of the loop. –  edA-qa mort-ora-y May 15 '12 at 3:54
1  
@edA-qamort-ora-y: I tend to agree that there is a slight language defect lurking in here, but I think it's specifically the fact that lifetime extension happens implicitly whenever you directly bind a temporary to a reference, but not in any other situation - this seems like a half-baked solution to the underlying problem of temporary lifetimes, although that's not to say it's obvious what a better solution would be. Perhaps an explicit 'lifetime extension' syntax when constructing the temporary, which makes it last until the end of the current block - what do you think? –  ndkrempel May 15 '12 at 4:17
    
@edA-qamort-ora-y: ... this amounts to the same thing as binding the temporary to a reference, but has the advantage of being more explicit for the reader that 'lifetime extension' is occurring, inline (in an expression, rather than requiring a separate declaration), and not requiring you to name the temporary. –  ndkrempel May 15 '12 at 4:24
1  
possible duplicate of temporary object in range-based for –  ildjarn May 15 '12 at 15:41
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3 Answers

up vote 55 down vote accepted

Is this correct and Widely appreciated?

Yes, your understanding of things is correct.

Which part of the above is the "bad" part, that should be avoided?

The bad part is taking an l-value reference to a temporary returned from a function, and binding it to an r-value reference. It is just as bad as this:

auto &&t = Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize();

The temporary Vector{1., 2., 3.}'s lifetime cannot be extended because the compiler has no idea that the return value from normalize references it.

Would the language be improved by changing the definition of the range-based for loop such that temporaries constructed in the for-expression exist for the duration of the loop?

That would be highly inconsistent with how C++ works.

Would it prevent certain gotchas made by people using chained expressions on temporaries or various lazy-evaluation methods for expressions? Yes. But it would also be require special-case compiler code, as well as be confusing as to why it doesn't work with other expression constructs.

A much more reasonable solution would be some way to inform the compiler that the return value of a function is always a reference to this, and therefore if the return value is bound to a temporary-extending construct, then it would extend the correct temporary. That's a language-level solution though.

Presently (if the compiler supports it), you can make it so that normalize cannot be called on a temporary:

struct Vector {
  double x, y, z;
  // ...
  Vector &normalize() & {
     double s = 1./sqrt(x*x+y*y+z*z);
     x *= s; y *= s; z *= s;
     return *this;
  }
  Vector &normalize() && = delete;
};

This will cause Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize() to give a compile error, while v.normalize() will work fine. Obviously you won't be able to do correct things like this:

Vector t = Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize();

But you also won't be able to do incorrect things.

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1  
The thing that might make this more of a "gotcha" is that the new for loop is syntactically hiding the fact that reference binding is going on under the covers - i.e. it's a lot less blatant than your "just as bad" examples above. That's why it seemed plausible to suggest the extra lifetime extension rule, just for the new for loop. –  ndkrempel May 15 '12 at 3:57
1  
@ndkrempel: Yes, but if you're going to propose a language feature to fix this (and therefore have to wait until 2017 at least), I would prefer if it were more comprehensive, something that could solve the temporary extension problem everywhere. –  Nicol Bolas May 15 '12 at 4:03
2  
+1. On the last approach, rather than delete you could provide an alternative operation that returns an rvalue: Vector normalize() && { normalize(); return std::move(*this); } (I believe that the call to normalize inside the function will dispatch to the lvalue overload, but someone should check it :) –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 15 '12 at 13:39
3  
I have never seen this &/&& qualification of methods. Is this from C++11 or is this some (maybe widespread) proprietary compiler extension. Gives interresting possibilities. –  Christian Rau May 15 '12 at 14:08
1  
@ChristianRau: It's new to C++11, and analogous to C++03 "const" and "volatile" qualifications of non-static member functions, in that it is qualifying "this" in some sense. g++ 4.7.0 does not support it however. –  ndkrempel May 15 '12 at 16:35
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for (double x : Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize()) { ... }

That is not a limitation of the language, but a problem with your code. The expression Vector{1., 2., 3.} creates a temporary, but the normalize function returns an lvalue-reference. Because the expression is an lvalue, the compiler assumes that the object will be alive, but because it is a reference to a temporary, the object dies after the full expression is evaluated, so you are left with a dangling reference.

Now, if you change your design to return a new object by value rather than a reference to the current object, then there would be no issue and the code would work as expected.

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1  
Would a const reference extend the lifetime of the object in this case? –  David Stone May 15 '12 at 3:32
5  
Which would break the clearly desired semantics of normalize() as a mutating function on an existing object. Thus the question. That a temporary has an "extended lifespan" when used for the specific purpose of an iteration, and not otherwise, is I think a confusing misfeature. –  Andy Ross May 15 '12 at 3:32
2  
@AndyRoss: Why? Any temporary bound to an r-value reference (or const&) has its lifetime extended. –  Nicol Bolas May 15 '12 at 3:42
2  
@ndkrempel: Still, not a limitation of the range-based for loop, the same issue would come if you bind to a reference: Vector & r = Vector{1.,2.,3.}.normalize();. Your design has that limitation, and that means that either you are willing to return by value (which might make sense in many circumstances, and more so with rvalue-references and move), or else you need to handle the problem at the place of call: create a proper variable, then use it in the for loop. Also note that the expression Vector v = Vector{1., 2., 3.}.normalize().negate(); creates two objects... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 15 '12 at 3:49
1  
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: the problem with binding to const-reference is this: T const& f(T const&); is completely fine. T const& t = f(T()); is completely fine. And then, in another TU you discover that T const& f(T const& t) { return t; } and you cry... If operator+ operates on values, it is safer; then the compiler may optimize the copy out (Want Speed ? Pass by Values), but that's a bonus. The only binding of temporaries I would allow is binding to r-values references, but functions should then return values for safety and rely on Copy Elision / Move Semantics. –  Matthieu M. May 15 '12 at 15:50
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IMHO, the second example is already flawed. That the modifying operators return *this is convenient in the way you mentioned: it allows chaining of modifiers. It can be used for simply handing on the result of the modification, but doing this is error-prone because it can easily be overlooked. If I see something like

Vector v{1., 2., 3.};
auto foo = somefunction1(v, 17);
auto bar = somefunction2(true, v, 2, foo);
auto baz = somefunction3(bar.quun(v), 93.2, v.qwarv(foo));

I wouldn't automatically suspect that the functions modify v as a side-effect. Of course, they could, but it would be confusing. So if I was to write something like this, I would make sure that v stays constant. For your example, I would add free functions

auto normalized(Vector v) -> Vector {return v.normalize();}
auto negated(Vector v) -> Vector {return v.negate();}

and then write the loops

for( double x : negated(normalized(v)) ) { ... }

and

for( double x : normalized(Vector{1., 2., 3}) ) { ... }

That is IMO better readable, and it's safer. Of course, it requires an extra copy, however for heap-allocated data this could likely be done in a cheap C++11 move operation.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. As usual, there are many choices. One situation where your suggestion may not be viable is if Vector is an array (not heap allocated) of 1000 doubles, for example. A trade-off of efficiency, ease-of-use, and safety-of-use. –  ndkrempel May 15 '12 at 15:34
2  
Yes, but it's seldom useful to have structures with size > ≈100 on the stack, anyway. –  leftaroundabout May 15 '12 at 15:46
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