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I need to access the selection in Emacs buffer. I have found this article How do I access the contents of the current region in Emacs Lisp? and it helps me a lot.

But there is a problem. The first time I select (highlight) a region, it works okay, but when I press C-g, and move cursor normally to another place without highlighting any chars, I got a string from last mark to the current point while I expect an empty one.

Actually I need to implement a function which will return the current selection (highlighted) as a string, or empty string if nothing is highlighted. The following code may express me more clearly.


(defun get-search-term ()
  (interactive)
  (let (
        (selection (buffer-substring-no-properties (region-beginning) (region-end))))
    (if (= (length selection) 0)
        (message "empty string")
      (message selection))))

Any suggestions? Thanks a lot!

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1  
Any reason that you're not using the interactive form shown by Gareth Rees in the question that you linked to? –  phils May 15 '12 at 4:50
    
Thanks for your reply, and sorry for not reading that article carefully enough. (interactive "r") has solved my problem. I need to read more about interactive. –  sailing May 15 '12 at 4:57
1  
possible duplicate of How do I access the contents of the current region in Emacs Lisp? –  phils May 15 '12 at 5:14
    
Seems not yet. I modified my code and test Gareth Rees's, and the problem is still there. Maybe I need to clear the point and mark before get the region? –  sailing May 15 '12 at 5:24
    
btw, sorry for my first comment, maybe I have not test enough. –  sailing May 15 '12 at 5:28
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2 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted

"r" specification of interactive is dumb. You're seeing why.

(defun get-search-term (beg end)
  "message region or \"empty string\" if none highlighted"
  (interactive (if (use-region-p)
                   (list (region-beginning) (region-end))
                 (list (point-min) (point-min))))
  (let ((selection (buffer-substring-no-properties beg end)))
    (if (= (length selection) 0)
        (message "empty string")
      (message selection))))

I don't mean "dumb" as in stupid and not useful; just that it doesn't care about whether the mark is active or not. I think it predates transient-mark-mode.

EDIT: Using (point-min) twice above makes the code harder to understand when re-reading. Here is a better implementation:

(defun get-search-term (beg end)
  "message region or \"empty string\" if none highlighted"
  (interactive (if (use-region-p)
                   (list (region-beginning) (region-end))
                 (list nil nil)))
  (message "%s" (if (and beg end)
                    (buffer-substring-no-properties beg end)
                  "empty string")))
share|improve this answer
    
The second point-min should be point-max, I think. –  ramen Jan 28 '13 at 3:22
    
@ramen I just corrected it. Than I re-read the question, and point-min is correct since it generates an empty string. –  event_jr Jan 28 '13 at 3:41
    
Now I've added a more understandable implementation. –  event_jr Jan 28 '13 at 3:47
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Check variable mark-active eg. C-h v mark-active

==> mark-active is a variable defined in `C source code'. Its value is nil Local in buffer Apropos; global value is nil

Automatically becomes buffer-local when set in any fashion.

Documentation: Non-nil means the mark and region are currently active in this buffer.

(defun get-search-term ()
  (interactive)
  (if mark-active
      (let (
        (selection (buffer-substring-no-properties (region-beginning) (region-end))))
    (if (= (length selection) 0)
        (message "empty string")
      (message selection))
    )
    (error "mark not active"))
  )
share|improve this answer
2  
mark-active will only work if you use transient-mark-mode, so it's fine for your own use, but if the code should be useable by others, you should use region-active-p (or use-region-p) instead. –  Stefan May 16 '12 at 13:07
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