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I'm embedding mono 2.10.8 into my application and have some troubles with functions, registered with mono_add_internal_call

Let's say i have managed method:

internal delegate void Win32ServiceHandler(long statusCode);

internal static class Win32Service
{
  [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)]
  public static extern void Test(Win32ServiceHandler handler);
}

it's unmanaged definition:

void icall_TestDelegateCallback(MonoDelegate *ftn) {
  LPHANDLER_FUNCTION f = (LPHANDLER_FUNCTION)mono_delegate_to_ftnptr(ftn);
  f(SERVICE_CONTROL_STOP);
}

and some code to test:

protected virtual void ServiceHandler(Win32ServiceControl statusCode)
{   
  Console.WriteLine("here");
}

public void MakeTest()
{
  Console.WriteLine("before");
  Win32Service.Test(this.ServiceHandlerInternal);
  Console.WriteLine("after");
}

I run it from console application and when i call MakeTest(), the output is:

before
here

And application never return.

Actually it is a simplified eexample. In real program i need to pass function pointer as a callback to RegisterServiceCtrlHandler so stuff like mono_runtime_invoke (that btw works fine) etc isn't what i need.

The question is what is the proper way to call a function pointer obtained from MonoDelegate? Or is it any other correct way to pass it as a callback?

My platform is Windows 7 x64

UPD:

Interesting finding. Once i change my code to:

internal static class Win32Service
{
  [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.InternalCall)]
  public static extern void Test(Action handler);
}

and

typedef VOID (*TESTFTN)();

void icall_TestDelegateCallback(MonoDelegate *ftn) {
  TESTFTN f = (TESTFTN)mono_delegate_to_ftnptr(ftn);
  f();
}

and:

public void MakeTest()
{
  Console.WriteLine("before");
  Win32Service.Test(() => Console.WriteLine("here"));
  Console.WriteLine("after");
}

Everithing works great. So the problem is in marshalling long to DWORD? In this how it can be solved?

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1 Answer 1

A DWORD is a 32bit integer type, while a long in C# is a 64 bit type.

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thanks, but changing type to int doesn't affect anything –  ILya May 15 '12 at 15:14

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